Luther's Lives: Two Contemporary Accounts of Martin Luther

By Elizabeth Vandiver; Ralph Keen et al. | Go to book overview

1

Philip Melanchthon
and the historical Luther

by Ralph Keen

'Isaiah… John the Baptist… Paul… Augustine… Luther': with these five names Philip Melanchthon identified the points of descent in the transmission of the true faith of the church.1 The occasion was Luther's funeral, at which Melanchthon, the eulogist, would describe the Wittenberg community as being like orphans bereft of an excellent and faithful father.2 The combination of reverence and affection for the great Reformer reflected in these comments has cast all of Luther's Protestant contemporaries in his shadow. If Luther remains a figure of heroic proportions, it is due as much to the work of his admirers as to his own efforts. And Philip Melanchthon, Luther's closest colleague, was so successful in creating a legendary Luther that his own role in Reformation history has been regarded as less substantial and influential than it actually was.

Born in 1497 in Bretten, a town north of Pforzheim, and educated at Heidelberg (BA 1511) and Tübingen (MA 1513), Melanchthon was very much a product of the southwestern German regions. His grandfather was mayor of Bretten; a great-uncle by marriage was the humanist Johann Reuchlin; and his father, who died when Philip was eleven, was an armorer for the Heidelberg court. Placed under Reuchlin's care after his father's death, Melanchthon attended the Latin School at Pforzheim, where he excelled at Greek, Latin, and Hebrew, and went on to the arts program at Heidelberg. Here he received as thorough a grounding in the classics as was possible in Germany at the time, and acquired some familiarity with theology and natural science as well.3

In 1518 Melanchthon was called to Wittenberg to take up a newly instituted professorship of Greek. It was the second such position in Germany (Leipzig had the first) and Melanchthon was the second choice (Leipzig's incumbent was the preferred candidate). Melanchthon, although only twenty-one, was well trained and showed potential for making Wittenberg a center of humanism like Heidelberg, Tübingen – or Leipzig. Saxony had been divided in the preceding century, and the electoral, or Ernestine, branch wished to build a center of culture comparable to Leipzig, in the rival Albertine branch. The political division between the two branches would become a bitter religious conflict by the 1520s.

Humanism would not, however, be the movement that brought Wittenberg

-7-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Luther's Lives: Two Contemporary Accounts of Martin Luther
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Scholars vi
  • Abbreviations vii
  • Introduction 1
  • 1: Philip Melanchthon and the Historical Luther 7
  • 2: Philip Melanchthon's History of the Life and Acts of Dr Martin Luther 15
  • 3: Johannes Cochlaeus 41
  • 4: The Deeds and Writings of Martin Luther from the Year of the Lord 1517 to the Year 1546 Related Chronologically to All Posterity by Johannes Cochlaeus 54
  • Translator's Note 356
  • Appendix 357
  • Works Cited 361
  • Notes 372
  • Index 406
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 412

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.