Interpreting the Labour Party: Approaches to Labour Politics and History

By John Callaghan; Steven Fielding et al. | Go to book overview

Contributors

Lawrence Black is Fulbright-Robertson Visiting Professor of British History at Westminster College, Missouri, USA during 2002–3. He is the author of The Political Culture of the Left in Affluent Britain, 1951–64: Old Labour, New Britain? (2003). A volume co-edited with Hugh Pemberton, An Affluent Society? Britain's Post-War 'Golden Age' Revisited is forthcoming. He is currently researching British political culture and post-war affluence.

John Callaghan is Professor of Politics at the University of Wolverhampton and the author of Socialism in Britain (1990), The Retreat of Social Democracy (2000) and Crisis, Cold War and Conflict: the Communist Party 1951–68 (2003).

David Coates is the Worrell Professor of Anglo-American Studies at Wake Forest University in North Carolina, USA. He has recently edited (with Peter Lawler) New Labour into Power (2000), and Paving the Way: The Critique of 'Parliamentary Socialism' (2003), the latter being a collection of essays on the Labour Party drawn largely from The Socialist Register and written by scholars sympathetic to the perspective discussed in his chapter.

Madeleine Davis is a Lecturer in Politics at Queen Mary College, University of London. The chapter presented here is based on research undertaken for her doctoral thesis, New Left Review's Analysis of Britain 1964–1990, completed in 1999. As well as the New Left, she also has an interest in Latin American politics and is the editor of The Pinochet Case (2003).

Steven Fielding is Professor of Contemporary Political History in the School of English, Sociology, Politics and Contemporary History and Associate Director of the European Studies Research Institute at the University of Salford. His recent publications include The Labour Party. Continuity and Change in the Making of 'New' Labour (2003) and The Labour Governments, 1964–70. Volume One. Labour and Cultural Change (Manchester, 2004).

Colin Hay is Professor of Political Analysis and Head of the Department of Political Science and International Studies at the University of Birmingham. He is co-editor of the new international journal Comparative European Politics and the author or editor of a number of volumes, including The Political Economy of New Labour (1999), Demystifying Globalisation (2001), Political Analysis (2002) and British Politics Today (2002).

Steve Ludlam is a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Politics at the University of Sheffield. His most recent publication, co-written by Martin J. Smith, is New Labour in Government (2001). He is convenor of the Labour Movements' specialist group in the UK Political Studies Association.

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