Beyond Isabella: Secular Women Patrons of Art in Renaissance Italy

By Sheryl E. Reiss; David G. Wilkins | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

It is a great pleasure for us to acknowledge the institutions and the many individuals who have assisted and encouraged us during the preparation of this book. We have each thanked the scholars who aided with our own contributions in our respective essays, and we wish to express here our gratitude to those who helped with the book as a whole. First and foremost, we are grateful to the contributors, whose exciting scholarship comprises this volume. Our contributors have endured with patience an array of unexpected circumstances during the course of this project. All of the contributors have offered helpful advice and welcome assurance. We wish to express particular gratitude to Roger Crum, Carolyn Valone, and Bruce Edelstein for their extensive contributions. Thanks are due to Cornell University and the University of Pittsburgh for institutional support and for the use of their fine libraries, which greatly facilitated the research for and editing of this volume. We also owe thanks to Peter Humfrey and to the second reader of the manuscript (who wishes to remain anonymous), both of whom offered many helpful suggestions that improved the manuscript significantly. Paul Evans, Gerhard Gruitrooy, Richard Oram, Linda Pellechia, Anna Maria Petrioli Tofani, and Gianni Tofani must be thanked for providing much-needed assistance in obtaining photographs and permissions. We are deeply grateful to Raymond Mentzer, general editor of Sixteenth Century Essays and Studies series, who has been unflaggingly supportive of this project from the outset. We are also most grateful to Paula Presley, Nancy Reschly, Mindy Butler-Christensen, and Michala Oestmann at the Truman State University Press and to its former director, Robert Schnucker.

We would like to thank a number of colleagues and friends who have offered constructive criticism, guidance, and moral support at various stages of this project. We are both indebted to Craig Felton, who introduced us many years ago. We are especially grateful to Larry Silver, John Paoletti, Konrad Eisenbichler, and Paul Barolsky, who offered sage advice at a critical moment. For fruitful discussions, wise counsel, and much-appreciated encouragement, we wish to acknowledge our gratitude to Patricia Fortini Brown, Caroline Elam, Stephen Edidin, Dagmar Eichberger, Sheila ffolliott, Sara Matthews-Grieco, Kenneth Gouwens, Ann Sutherland Harris, Ingo Herklotz, Beth Holman, Pamela Jones, Julius Kirshner, Peter Lynch, Louisa Matthew, Barbara McCloskey, Jacqueline Musacchio, W. David Myers, Alexander Nagel, Maureen Pelta, David Posner, Patricia Rucidlo, Beatrice Rehl, John Shearman, David Summers, Natalie Tomas, William Wallace, Saundra Weddle, and Lilian Zirpolo. For good advice and editorial comments, David wishes to thank Rebecca Wilkins, Katherine Wilkins, and Tyler Jennings, as well as his many students who have discussed patronage issues with him over the years. Sheryl wishes to express special thanks to friends, colleagues, and students now and formerly at Cornell, including Karen-edis Barzman, Amy Bloch, Jennifer Hallam, Cate Mellen, John Najemy, Kathleen Perry Long, Danuta Shanzer, and Margaret Webster. Sheryl's thanks are also due to members of Cornell's Renaissance Colloquium, especially Carol Kaske and William Kennedy. Finally, and most importantly, we wish to thank our families for their seemingly boundless patience with us during the long gestation of Beyond Isabella. Paul F. Goldsmith and Ann Thomas Wilkins, our spouses, have provided continuous support and good will, and it is to them that we dedicate this book.

-xxi-

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