Beyond Isabella: Secular Women Patrons of Art in Renaissance Italy

By Sheryl E. Reiss; David G. Wilkins | Go to book overview

About the Contributors

Molly Bourne teaches art history at Syracuse University in Florence, Italy. She received her Ph.D. from Harvard University (1998) with a thesis on the artistic patronage of Francesco II Gonzaga and its relationship to the patronage of his consort, Isabella d'Este. A specialist in the art and architecture of Renaissance Mantua, she has published on topics including villa design and cartography at the Gonzaga court, as well as on cultural exchange between Mantua and Spain. Currently she is editing and contributing to a collection of interdisciplinary essays on art and culture in Renaissance Mantua.

Roger J. Crum received his Ph.D. from the University of Pittsburgh in 1992, and in 2000 was named the Dr. Thomas C. and Janet M. Graul Chair in Art and Languages at the University of Dayton, where he has taught since 1991. A specialist in the art and architecture of Renaissance Florence, he has published articles and reviews in The Art Bulletin, Art Journal, Artibus et Historiae, Renaissance Quarterly, Renaissance Studies, and The Sixteenth Century Journal. Together with John T. Paoletti, he is presently editing a volume on the spaces of Florentine art, 1300–1600, forthcoming from Cambridge University Press. He has been a Samuel H. Kress predoctoral fellow at the Kunsthistorisches Institut in Florence, a fellow at the Newberry Library in Chicago, and a member of the Institute for Advanced Study at Princeton.

Bruce L. Edelstein currently teaches in Florence for New York University and Florida State University. He received his Ph.D. from Harvard University in 1995 after completing a dissertation on the patronage of Eleonora di Toledo. He has held teaching positions at Syracuse University in Italy and the Harvard University Graduate School of Design, and curatorial and research positions at the Medici Archive Project, the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston, and the Fogg Art Museum. In addition to contributing to the Dizionario biografico degli italiani, he continues to research and publish on various aspects of artistic patronage at the Medici court in the sixteenth century. Forthcoming articles treat Agnolo Bronzino's design for the vault fresco in the Chapel of Eleonora, the mid-sixteenth-century appearance and function of the Camera Verde in the Palazzo Vecchio, and the employment of the lost Neapolitan villa of Poggioreale as a model for the hydraulic systems in Medici villa and garden complexes. For the academic year 2001–2, he will be a fellow at Villa I Tatti, the Harvard University Center for Renaissance Studies.

Rosi Prieto Gilday received her doctorate in art history from the University of Pittsburgh. She specializes in Italian Renaissance art and architecture and has focused her research and teaching on political, literary, feminist, and economic issues in Florentine art. Her current research includes topics on Neri di Bicci, Andrea del Sarto, and Andrea del Castagno. Her article, "Contradiction and Ambivalence: Castagno's 'Famous Women' as Female Role Models," is forthcoming. She has taught at San Francisco State University, the University of Pittsburgh, and the University of the Pacific. She teaches at the California State University at Hayward.

A. Lawrence Jenkens is currently associate professor of art history at the University of New Orleans. He received his A.B. from Harvard University and his M.A. and Ph.D. from the Institute of Fine Arts, New York University. His research activities have focused on the architecture of Siena in the fifteenth century; he is the author of several articles on the Piccolomini family and architectural patronage in late fifteenth-century Siena. and is editing and contrib-

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