John Quincy Adams: His Theory and Ideas

By George A. Lipsky | Go to book overview

5
Social Origins and Social Solidarity

There are several subjects upon which the public mind in this country is taking a turn which alarms me greatly for the continuance of this Union -- the bank; the currency; the internal improvement question; the extension or repression of slavery. . . .

MEMOIRS, January 2, 1820

The general background, environmental and personal, has been drawn. Against that background the more specific doctrines of John Quincy Adams will stand out in clearer relief. At this point his precepts with respect to society in general may be introduced. This discussion will make it possible to comprehend Adams's emphases with respect to fundamental social forces and what he believed to have been the motivations in man's nature combining to make him a social being.1 On that foundation may be established the structure of his values concerning men and things within society. In turn, this analysis will reveal his classifications of men in the social order and the interests that he thought men, related socially, represented and created. His views of the problem of the relations of races will be relevant to this analysis, for therein lay much of importance to his theory of social organization. And finally, his views

____________________
1
John Quincy Adams, The Social Compact, Exemplified in the Constitution of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts; with Remarks on the Theories of Divine Right of Hobbes and of Filmer, and the Counter Theories of Sidney, Locke, Montesquieu, and Rousseau, concerning the Origin and Nature of Government, a lecture delivered before the Franklin Lyceum at Providence, R. I., November 25, 1842 ( Providence: Knowles and Vose, 1842), p. 12, hereafter cited as Adams, The Social Compact: "Man is therefore by the law of nature's God, a social being. . . ;" in Adams's thought, man, from his earliest use of his intelligence, was thrown into association with his fellows, a beginning society. This view greatly reduced the importance of the state of nature in Adams's theory.

-87-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
John Quincy Adams: His Theory and Ideas
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 347

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.