Missouri, the Heart of the Nation

By William E. Parrish; Charles T. Jones Jr. et al. | Go to book overview

FOUR
Missouri and the Opening
of the American West

In the first decade of the nineteenth century, Missouri stood between a line of Anglo American population advancing westward and what we today call the American West. West of the great bend of the Missouri River (95th meridian) lay a vast area of land still largely unknown and unchartered. Part of this land fell within the Louisiana Purchase, but a greater portion still belonged to Spain's overseas empire. Composed of a variety of physiographic regions, the American West begins with the Great Plains, extending north to the Canadian border, south to the Rio Grande, and continues west across the Rocky Mountains to the Pacific Ocean. The Great Plains stretch treeless and dry to the very foot of the Rocky Mountains. For years Americans viewed it as the Great American Desert, a land fit for "savages" and "misfits" and unworthy of the enterprise of American settlers. Down its western side, the Rocky Mountains spread from Canada into northern New Mexico. Pioneers on their way to the "promised land" of Oregon or the "get rich quick" gold fields of California found the "backbone of the continent" a towering obstacle to overcome. Beyond the mountains are river plateaus, mesas, basins, deserts, more mountains, canyons, forests, and grasslands. Not too distant from the Sierra Nevada in California looms the Pacific Ocean. The American West offered challenge, adventure, and opportunity to those who would explore and conquer it.


The Lewis and Clark Expedition

Little was known of this land before 1800 except its vastness. Long before he made the Louisiana Purchase, Thomas Jefferson had expressed considerable interest in learning more about this great expanse. When he became President, Jefferson persuaded Congress to

-64-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Missouri, the Heart of the Nation
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 474

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.