John Quincy Adams: His Theory and Ideas

By George A. Lipsky | Go to book overview
Index
Abolition, 123
academic freedom, 169
Adams, Abigail, 6, 7
Adams, Brooks, 4, 49, 59, 108, 171
Adams, John, 7, 186
Adams, John Quincy
ability, 60
ambition, 57
ambition for Presidency, 238
appointment as Minister Resident to The Netherlands, 11
appointment as minister to Prussia, 12
appointment as minister to Russia, 18
appointment as minister to the Court of St. James, 27
appointment as Secretary of State, 29
attitude toward mankind, 84
bar, admittance to, 10
career as member of House of Representatives, 40
commencement speech of, 9
as a "conscience" Whig, 270
as a constitutionalist, 222
death, 45
economic forces, grasp of, 116
economy, attitude toward, 31
empiricism, 332
father of (see John Adams), 7, 10, 186
Federalism, 240
general welfare, 148
human sympathy, 55
as interpreter of European affairs, 19
Locke, indebtedness to, 97-98, 32730
Memoirs of, 7, 59
mother of (see Abigail Adams), 6, 7
parents of, 6
personality, 31, 52, 54; as a legislator, 54
philosophy of, 4, 5, 327
as political theorist, 265
as Puritan, 10, 100
puritanism, 66
republicanism, 66
as scientist, 4
sense of duty, 61, 63
sense of rectitude, 51
Supreme Court, offer of appointment by Madison, 21
Adams, Henry, 108
Adams, Thomas Boylston, 12
Adams, William, 23
Age of Reason, 260
agrarian democracy, 263, 265
agrarian interests, 103, 115
agriculture, 110, 117
Alexander I ( Emperor of Russia), 19, 133, 281
Alien and Sedition Laws, 164
American government, 205, 209
American Philosophical Society, 82
American Revolution, 7, 97, 101, 141, 154, 196, 209, 211, 318
American system, 79, 134, 166, 193, 308
Amistad case, 168
Amsterdam, 8
Anglo-Saxons, 123
Annals of Congress, 5
Anti-Federalist Party, 261
Antimasonic Party, 44, 45, 58, 269
Antimasons, 269
Aquinas, St. Thomas, 327
aristocracy, 9, 104, 108, 109, 170, 171
Articles of Confederation, 214, 215
Atherton resolution, 154
authority paternal, 160

-341-

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