The Case of the Ugly Suitor: and Other Histories of Love, Gender, and Nation in Buenos Aires, 1776-1870

By Jeffrey M. Shumway | Go to book overview

5. “The Purity of My Blood”
Attitudes toward Interracial Marriage

Lorenzo Barbosa could not believe what his daughter Josefa was contemplating. In early 1821 she had fallen in love with Pascual Cruz, a mulatto. For Lorenzo such a relationship was out of the question, for he and his family were white. When the couple asked his permission to marry, he expressed his revulsion by exercising his paternal right to withhold his consent. In return, Josefa and Pascual exercised their right to take Lorenzo Barbosa to court. In court Lorenzo invoked the royal Pragmatic on Marriage to support his contention that Lorenzo was unequal to his daughter. Pascual, on the other hand, claimed that Lorenzo's argument of racial inequality was “irrational” and should be dismissed by the judge. Three witnesses appeared before the judge, and each one confirmed that Pascual's father was a mulatto, thus confirming the young suitor was indeed of African descent. The judge pressed further. How was Pascual's moral conduct and behavior? The three witnesses praised him on all counts. The judge then asked Josefa what she wanted to do. She was eager to marry Pascual. After considering all the information, the judge overruled Lorenzo's opposition and granted the couple permission to marry.1

In addition to revealing attitudes concerning romantic love, disensos are a useful tool to examine attitudes about race in Buenos Aires, especially since race was a major factor in many parents' opposition. Lorenzo's prejudice was not uncommon in Buenos Aires in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. The idea of limpieza de sangre (purity of blood) had a long history in Buenos Aires and Hispanic America in general and was especially prevalent in the middle and upper classes. In disenso cases from the late-colonial period, racial inequality was the most frequent reason used by parents to oppose their children's marriages, and the parental success rate in these cases reached as high as 50 percent.2 However, colonial attitudes about interracial marriage

-97-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Case of the Ugly Suitor: and Other Histories of Love, Gender, and Nation in Buenos Aires, 1776-1870
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 201

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.