Enhancing Creativity in Adult and Continuing Education: Innovative Approaches, Methods, and Ideas

By Paul Jay Edelson; Patricia L. Malone | Go to book overview

A professional development program can be an exercise in creative
design and delivery when ideas come from multiple sources and the
program itself is continually being reinvented
.


The Harvard Management for Lifelong
Education Program: Creative
Approaches to Designing a Professional Development Program

Clifford Baden

The Harvard Institute for the Management of Lifelong Education (MLE) is a professional development program for leaders in postsecondary lifelong education programs. This annual two-week residential program was first offered in the summer of 1979. Since its inception, it has been cosponsored by the Harvard Graduate School of Education and the Office of Adult Learning Services at the College Board. Cliff Baden, who has written this article in a selfinterview format, has served as director of the program since 1984.


Program Founding and Development

To begin, can you tell us something about the program you found when you arrived
in 1984?

The story should start even earlier, with the founding of the MLE program. In 1978, Fred Jacobs, who was the director of Programs in Professional Education at Harvard, and Rex Moon, who was the head of a new venture at the College Board called Future Directions for a Learning Society, were brought together by Frank Keppel. Frank was a distinguished member of the faculty at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. All three of these people recognized that the face of higher education was changing as increasing numbers of adults were pursuing lifelong education. Some of this was happening, of

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