Enhancing Creativity in Adult and Continuing Education: Innovative Approaches, Methods, and Ideas

By Paul Jay Edelson; Patricia L. Malone | Go to book overview

The Bell Atlantic Corporation has entered into an agreement with
a consortium of community colleges in the Northeast for the
purpose of offering an associate degree in applied science with a
telecommunications concentration. The program, called NEXT STEP,
is offered to Bell Atlantic employees during their workday. This
specially designed degree program allows for a creative partnership
between education, labor, and industry
.


Creating Innovative Partnerships

James F. Polo, Louise M. Rotchford, Paula M. Setteducati

The more we share an idea, the more valuable it becomes.

—Raymond Smith

Teamwork and cooperation was the message presented by Raymond Smith, chief executive officer of Bell Atlantic, at a recent Long Island college commencement. Smith told the graduates that Bell Atlantic was now embracing both knowledge and teamwork as critical educational goals. Achieving those goals was going to be pivotal to the implementation of a newly fashioned corporate strategy that would result in an employee who would more readily fit into the workplace of the twenty-first century.


A New Model of Education

With his graduation-day comments, Smith challenged all educators to enter into completely new and unfamiliar territory and begin to work more closely with business to design degree and training programs that would be beneficial to students, business, and educational institutions. Specifically, he asked the faculty and administration of todays institutions to discard the old model of education that stressed individualism—working, studying, and learning alone—and pioneer a new model of education. This new way of teaching and learning would stress the value of technological competence coupled with a specific grouping of core competencies designed to produce

Note: We wish to acknowledge Arlene Beauchemin, human resources staff director at Bell Atlantic, for
providing us with the NYNEX in-house articles shown in the References, all of which she edited or
contributed to.

-67-

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