Enhancing Creativity in Adult and Continuing Education: Innovative Approaches, Methods, and Ideas

By Paul Jay Edelson; Patricia L. Malone | Go to book overview

Mastery, plasticity, a vision for the future, and a commitment to
ongoing experimentation will bring forth continuing education worthy
of our field's ideals
.


New Vistas for Adult Education

Paul Jay Edelson, Patricia L. Malone

This volume on creativity and its implications for adult and continuing education covers considerable territory in an attempt to suggest ways in which our field can be stretched and reinvented. All of our authors took risks—with their own organizations, with the populations they served, with the greater community, with business and civic audiences. All developed and conducted nuanced and complex dialogues within their programs and among the populations served. Forms of communication varied and often included multiple modalities—discussion groups, panels, forums, and classrooms with and without walls during both the design-development process and the implementation stages.

A multidisciplinary approach to problem solving was most frequently used; there was no single individual or disciplinary area that could offer exclusive expertise. This was most evident in Mary Lindenstein Walshok's concept of webs of talent, through which her creative process took flight with unexpected turns that could not possibly have occurred if the traditional deference to discipline-based knowledge was followed.

Nassau Community College took a different approach to an established program and in so doing redefined the role of continuing education within the institution, which came to be viewed differently as James Polo, Louise Rotchford, and Paula Setteducati diplomatically and carefully assumed control of a program with high visibility in their school, the labor union, and the corporation. Bill Clutter of Pace University presented the story of a similar transformation in continuing education at Pace, where outreach also became a principal way of redefining the entire university with important beneficial results.

Susan Anderson redesigned a conventional learning model for parents of schoolchildren. Like Walshok, she had to address the replacement of the

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