A Short Guide to Fibromyalgia

By Daniel J. Wallace; Janice Brock Wallace | Go to book overview

Appendix 3
Fibromyalgia: A Complementary
Medicine Doctor's Perspective

By Soram Singh Khalsa, M.D.

Soram Singh Khalsa, M.D., is a board-certified in⁃
ternist and past chairman of the Executive Steering
Committee of the Complementary Medicine Program
at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles. He
currently is the medical director of the East West
Medical Research Institute. Over the past two and a
half decades, he has broadened his training both in
the United States and abroad by staying on the lead⁃
ing edge of therapeutics using homeopathy, acu⁃
puncture, andphytotherapeutics, which he integrates
into his traditional practice of internal medicine. A
graduate of Yale University, Dr. Khalsa is a found⁃
ing member of the American Holistic Medical Asso⁃
ciation, and the American Academy of Medical
Acupuncture. Dr. Khalsa may be reached at his
website www.khalsamedical.com.

I appreciate this opportunity to present the complementary medicine clinician's perspective on the treatment of fibromyalgia. Complemen⁃ tary medicine is being used by an increasing percentage of Americans. In an article published in the New England Journal of Medicine in 1993, Dr. David Eisenberg stated that approximately one in three people in America had obtained treatment using complementary medicine over the course of a single year. A subsequent study by Dr. Eisenberg pub⁃ lished in 1998, indicated that over the preceding seven years there had been a 47 percent increase in total visits to alternative medicine

-179-

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