In Search of Democracy: The NAACP Writings of James Weldon Johnson, Walter White, and Roy Wilkins (1920-1977)

By Sondra Kathryn Wilson | Go to book overview

James Weldon Johnson
(June 17, 1871–June 26, 1938)

A Chronology
1871Born to James and Helen Louise Dillet Johnson on June 17, in Jacksonville, Florida.
1884Makes trip to New York City.
1886Meets Frederick Douglass in Jacksonville.
1887Graduates from Stanton School, Jacksonville. Enters Atlanta University Preparatory Division.
1890Graduates from Atlanta University Preparatory Division. Enters Atlanta University's freshman class.
1891Teaches school in Henry County, Georgia, during the summer following his freshman year.
1892Wins Atlanta University Oratory Prize for "The Best Methods of Removing the Disabilities of Caste from the Negro."
1893Meets Paul Laurence Dunbar at the Chicago World's Fair.
1894Receives B.A. degree with honors from Atlanta University. Delivers valedictory speech, "The Destiny of the Human Race." Tours New England with the Atlanta University Quartet for three months. Is appointed principal of Stanton School in Jacksonville, Florida, the largest African-American public school in the state.
1895Founds the Daily American, an afternoon daily serving Jacksonville's black population.
1896Expands Stanton School to high school status, making it the first public high school for blacks in the state of Florida.
1898Becomes the first African American to be admitted to the Florida bar.

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