Modernity and Postmodern Culture

By Jim McGuigan | Go to book overview

GLOSSARY

The purpose of this selective glossary is not to provide exact dictionary definitions of words but, rather, to specify how certain key terms in the text of this book are used.

Accentuated modernity: the globalization of modernity’s transformative dynamics, characteristic of capitalist civilization, involving the further erosion of tradition; and which gives rise to the anxieties and uncertainties that are inaccurately labelled ‘postmodernity’, according to Giddens.

Anti-capitalist protest: came to widespread public attention with the carnivalesque disruption of the City of London in June 1999 and then the massive demonstration against the meeting of the World Trade Organization (WTO) in Seattle towards the end of that year. Whether this represents hostility to capitalism in its entirety or specifically to the neo-liberal mode of globalization is a matter of debate. See global justice movement.

Capitalism: an exploitative economic system, driven by the imperative of capital accumulation, the ultimate logic of which is to turn all human products into marketable commodities and to mediate all social relations.

Cognitive mapping: a speculative aesthetic principle, not a particular form, that is supposed to produce a sense of orientation for the human subject in society and space, according to Jameson.

Cool capitalism: an alternative concept to Jeremy Rifkin’s notion of ‘cultural capitalism’. While cultural production has become increasingly important, it is absurd to suggest that it has eclipsed material production in the global economy. Rather, capitalism has adopted counter-cultural features, summarily the culture of ‘cool’, that were ostensibly critical of capitalism in the past so that commodity consumption may be represented ironically as somehow rebellious and even revolutionary, thereby incorporating the signs of opposition, though not the practices of opposition, into the mainstream. Cool capitalism is exemplified most obviously by the marketing strategies and brand image of companies such as Apple.

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Modernity and Postmodern Culture
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Issues in Cultural and Media Studies ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents ix
  • Series Preface xi
  • Preface to the Second Edition xiii
  • Acknowledgements to the Second Edition xv
  • Introduction 1
  • 1: Declaring the Postmodern 9
  • 2: Modernity–a Contradictory Project 34
  • 3: Scrambled Images 59
  • 4: Fractured Identities 85
  • 5: The Information Age 115
  • 6: Reflexive Modernity 137
  • Conclusion 169
  • Glossary 172
  • References 176
  • Index 189
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