Defining Print Culture for Youth: The Cultural Work of Children's Literature

By Anne Lundin; Wayne A. Wiegand | Go to book overview

3
PUBLISHING PRIDE:
THE JIM CROW SERIES OF
HARLOW PUBLISHING COMPANY

Louise S. Robbins

“Excellent readers in the Negro American Series, designed to be used with Negro children, to give them a pride in their race and to inspire them to become good American citizens. Brief biographical information about outstanding colored people of yesterday and today has been skillfully worked into the text. Photographs and silhouettes are used as illustrations. Large type.”1 So read the review of Emma E. Akin's four graded readers in the American Library Association's Booklist, a tool used by librarians across the United States to make selections for their collections.

The books—Negro Boys and Girls, Gifts, A Booker T. Washington School, and Ideals and Adventures—were unusual in the book world in 1938. First, they were designed and published specifically for African-American students. Second, their author, Emma E. Akin, supervisor of elementary grades for the Drumright, Oklahoma School District, was white. Third, the books were published by the Harlow Publishing Company of Oklahoma City, a firm closely associated with Oklahoma's white political establishment, owned and operated by Victor E. Harlow. What were the books' explicit and implicit messages? How widely known and used were they? Why did Akin labor to write and Harlow choose to publish books designed to instill pride in African-American children in segregated schools? While the evidence yields answers perhaps as fragile as the books' now brittle pages, the books' anomalous character makes the questions worth exploring.

At the beginning of each book, Akin explains “Why This Book Was Made.” In language that differs only slightly from title to title, she explains: ““T”his book was made to help you learn more about your own

-41-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Defining Print Culture for Youth: The Cultural Work of Children's Literature
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction xi
  • 1: Reading and Re-Reading 1
  • 2: Communism for Kids 27
  • 3: Publishing Pride 41
  • 4: The Power of Black and White 61
  • 5: Defining Democracy for Youth Through Textbooks 77
  • 6: [Being Poor Doesn't Count] 101
  • 7: Turning Child Readers into Consumers 121
  • 8: Learning to Be a Woman 139
  • 9: Kate Chopin and the Birth of Young Adult Fiction 155
  • 10: Reading Nancy Drew in Urban India 169
  • Index 197
  • About the Editors and Contributors 203
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 206

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.