Parenting the Millennial Generation: Guiding Our Children Born between 1982 and 2000

By Dave Verhaagen | Go to book overview

4

Ten Traits of Good Parents

Over the past few years, I have interviewed and observed dozens of parents that I thought were especially good. I found a few common characteristics that most of them shared. This wasn't a scientific study; it was just my own systematic observation. Not all good parents have each of these traits, but they seem to have most of them. At the back of this chapter, after the following discussion of the ten traits, is an self-assessment questionnaire.


THEY HAVE A VISION FOR THEIR CHILDREN

I remember a lunch at which I was enthralled by a dad named Ken who was talking about his son named Ken. Without a hint of arrogance or presumption he spoke of what can only be called his vision for his boy. [I want him to be a man of integrity,] the elder Ken said, [and someone that has the courage to do the right thing, even in tough situations.] I loved what I was hearing. From that point on, I paid close attention to what parents said about their kids. I found that the better parents often spoke in these terms. They had vision for their children.

Before talking about what true vision is, let's talk about what vision is not. It is not [He will grow up to be president someday] or [He's going to be the best pro basketball player since Michael Jordan] or even [She's going to be the class president her senior year.] These are things over which you have little or no control. There are too many variables outside your sphere of influence for any of these ideas to be your vision for your child. All of them are good things to hope for, but you can't have a vision for something that relies on the decisions of others.

Having a vision for your child has more to do with the character of your child, not his or her specific accomplishments. Granted, you cannot completely influence your child's character, but you can have a huge amount of input into what kind of person your child develops into. Ken may have hoped that little Ken would get good grades, go to a good college, and get a good job, but he was more concerned that the boy grow up to be a good man. This is the true nature of vision.

-27-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Parenting the Millennial Generation: Guiding Our Children Born between 1982 and 2000
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction xi
  • 1: Who is This Millennial Generation? 1
  • 2: A Whole New World 11
  • 3: What, Me Worry 19
  • 4: Ten Traits of Good Parents 27
  • 5: Kids with a Hope and a Future 43
  • 6: Risk Factors 51
  • Introduction to Protective Factors 63
  • 7: Emotional Protective Factors 67
  • 8: Cognitive Protective Factors 81
  • 9: Academic Protective Factors 97
  • 10: Personality Protective Factors 111
  • 11: Social Protective Factors 125
  • 12: Family Protective Factors 135
  • My Last Gasp 145
  • References and Further Reading 147
  • Index 159
  • About the Author 163
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 166

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.