The Letters of John Stuart Mill - Vol. 2

By John Stuart Mill; Hugh S. R. Elliot | Go to book overview

feminin c'est matériellement impossible; et chez le petit nombre des privilégiées il en reste toujours assez pour les rendre dures, égoistes et cruelles, à moins d'en être préservées par une culture morale qui serait tout aussi efficace dans un état de choses plus naturel. Il me semble que l'idéal propre à l'existence humaine serait tout autre que cet idéal de fantaisie, sans être pour cela moins poétique; ce serait l'idée d'une personne complète dans toutes ses facultés, propre à toutes les tâches et à toutes les épreuves de la vie, mais qui les remplissait avec une grandeur d'âme, une force de raison et une tendresse de cœur très au-dessus de ce qui a lieu maintenant, sauf peut-être chez les plus admirables caractères dans leurs moments de plus grande exaltation. Si cet idéal a jamais été offert au genre humain c'est dans le Christ, et je ne sais pas ce qu'on pourrait demander de mieux soit à un homme soit à une femme sous le rapport de perfectionnement moral, que de lui ressembler. Or ce caractère-là, est aussi profondément réel que poétiquement élevé et émouvant.

1869 Aetat. 63.


To Mrs. P. A. TAYLOR, Secretary of the London National Society for Women's Suffrage.

7th October 1869.

DEAR MRS. TAYLOR,--One of my working-men correspondents, and the most thoughtful and intelligent of them, Mr. William Wood, of Hanley, Stoke-on-Trent, who has lately enrolled himself as a member of the London Woman Suffrage Society, is very desirous of having a public meeting, or, if that should be impossible, a lecture in his borough, and offers to take upon himself the work of making the arrangements; but he considers it a sine qua non that "one at least of the ladies who are the glory and no small part of the strength of the movement, be present to speak to us in its advocacy." . . .

I have written to propose to Mrs. Fawcett to take up the project; if she does not, would it be impossible for you to do so? It would be unfair to ask you, who have so

-218-

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The Letters of John Stuart Mill - Vol. 2
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vi
  • List of Illustrations vii
  • Chapter IX - 1864-1865 1
  • TO ALEXANDER BAIN. 3
  • To Earl GREY, 6
  • To ROBERT HARRISON, 11
  • To MAX KYLLMAN, of Manchester. 14
  • To JAMES BEAL, 16
  • To the Secretary of the Co-operative Plate-Lock Manufactory, Wolverhampton. 18
  • To JAMES BEAL, 21
  • To W. E. HICKSON, the educational writer, 26
  • To J. F. D. MAURICE, 28
  • To PARKE GODWIN, 30
  • To EDWIN CHADWICK, 31
  • To EDWIN L. GODKIN, of New York, 35
  • To MAX KYLLMAN, of Manchester 38
  • To a Correspondent, on a point raised in the "Liberty." 40
  • To RICHARD CONGREVE, on Mill's book on Comte. 42
  • To Professor T. H. HUXLEY, 43
  • To J. BOYD KINNEAR, 44
  • To a Correspondent in Southport, Connecticut 45
  • To a Schoolboy of Fourteen, in reply to a letter asking Mill's opinion on the question, "Is flogging good or bad for boys?" 46
  • Chapter X - 1866-1867 51
  • To the Secretary of the Commons Preservation Society, on the formation of that body. 53
  • To the Speaker's Secretary. 56
  • To JOHN CAMPBELL, of Liverpool. 57
  • From J. A. ROEBUCK to EDWIN CHADWICK, 58
  • To Mrs. CAROLINE LIDDELL, 59
  • TO DARBY GRIFFITH, M.P. 62
  • TO ROBERT PHARAZYN, of New Zealand. 62
  • To Mr. JOHN MORLEY, 63
  • TO DAVID URQUHART, the diplomatist, 66
  • TO DAVID URQUHART 68
  • To EDWIN CHADWICK. 71
  • To H. S. BRANDRETH, 72
  • To the Rev. T. W. TOWLE 74
  • To W. R. CREMER, 77
  • To R. RUSSELL. 79
  • To Archdeacon JOHN ALLEN, on Woman Suffrage. 80
  • TO G. W. SHARP, 81
  • TO WILLIAM WOOD, 82
  • To a Bond Street tradesman, 83
  • To the Rev. STEPHEN HAWTREY, 84
  • TO R. W. EMERSON, - introducing Lord Amberley 85
  • TO W. T. THORNTON, 86
  • TO Mr. OSCAR BROWNING. 87
  • To ALEXANDER BAIN. 90
  • To EDWIN CHADWICK. 92
  • To R. W. EMERSON, 94
  • To E. W. YOUNG, 96
  • To Miss FLORENCE NIGHTINGALE, 97
  • Chapter XI - 1868 106
  • To NICHOLAS KILBURN, 107
  • To JAMES TRASK, 108
  • To PETER DEML, a journalist of Vienna. 109
  • To Mr. GOLDWIN SMITH, 110
  • To a Correspondent, 115
  • To the Secretary of the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals. 116
  • To JAMES HENDERSON, of Glasgow, 119
  • To CHARLES ELIOT NORTON. 121
  • To THOMAS BEGGS, a member of Mill's election committee at Westminster, 122
  • To a Westminster Voter, 123
  • To EDWIN CHADWICK. 126
  • To the Right Hon. E. P. BOUVERIE, M.P. 127
  • To a Correspondent, 128
  • To a Westminster Voter, 133
  • To a Westminster Voter, 136
  • To J. H. FLETCHER, of Northampton, 137
  • To CHARLES BRADLAUGH, 138
  • To ALFRED STEINTHAL, Secretary pro tem of the Manchester Women's Suffrage Committee. 141
  • To GEORGE GROTE. 142
  • To ARCHIBALD MICHIE, of Victoria. 149
  • To the Hon. General Secretary of the Chelsea Work­ ing Men's Parliamentary Electoral Association, 151
  • To a Minister of New Zealand. 154
  • To the President of the Edinburgh Women's Suffrage Society, 155
  • To an Elector of Westminster, 157
  • To JAMES BEAL, 158
  • To Dr. E. L. YOUMANS, 159
  • To W. T. MALLESON, Hon. Sec. of Mill's Election Committee, 163
  • To PHILIP H. RATHBONE, 164
  • TO GEORGE HOWELL, 168
  • Chapter XII - (1869) 169
  • TO D. MCLAREN, M.P., 172
  • TO GEORGE W. SMALLEY, 173
  • TO W. T. THORNTON. 174
  • TO STANDISH O'GRADY, 175
  • TO E. JONES, 177
  • To the Secretary of the American Social Science Association, 178
  • TO HEWETT C. WATSON, 179
  • To a Youth of Fifteen, 180
  • To JAMES BEAL, 181
  • To the President of a Committee, 182
  • To T. CLIFFE LESLIE. 186
  • To PASQUALE VILLARI, 187
  • To HENRY FAWCETT, 190
  • To A. H. LOUIS, 192
  • To Lord AMBERLEY. 193
  • To A. LALANDE, 195
  • To EDWIN CHADWICK, 197
  • TO T. CLIFFE LESLIE, 198
  • To A. M. FRANCIS, of Brisbane, Queensland, on various political questions. 199
  • To A. LALANDE, 200
  • To P. A. TAYLOR, M.P., 202
  • To Dr. CAZELLES, 203
  • To ALEXANDER BAIN. 206
  • To ALEXANDER BAIN, 209
  • To G. CROOM ROBERTSON, 210
  • To Mrs. BEECHER HOOKER, 212
  • To ANDREW REID, of the Land Tenure Reform Association. 213
  • To T. CLIFFE LESLIE; 214
  • To FREDERI MISTRAL, 215
  • To Mrs. P. A. TAYLOR, Secretary of the London National Society for Women's Suffrage. 217
  • To W. T. THORNTON. 218
  • To Dr. CAZELLES, 219
  • To HENRY FAWCETT. 223
  • To JAMES M. BARNARD, of Boston. 226
  • To J. E. CAIRNES, 228
  • To the PRINCESS ROYAL OF PRUSSIA, 230
  • Chapter XIII - 1870 233
  • To PASQUALE VILLARI, on the education of women. 235
  • To Judge CHAPMAN, 235
  • To WILLIAM MALLESON, 237
  • To Lord AMBERLEY, 238
  • To HORACE WHITE, of the Chicago Tribune; on Chinese labour. 239
  • To ALEXANDER CAMPBELL, of Glasgow. 242
  • To FANNY LEWALD-STAHR, 243
  • TO SIR ROBERT COLLIER. 245
  • To Mrs. HICKSON, 245
  • To H. TAINE, 246
  • To a Lady, 249
  • To ALEXANDER BAIN, 250
  • To Sir CHARLES DILKE, 254
  • To GEORGE ADCROFT, 255
  • To J. BOYD KINNEAR, 262
  • To H. K. RUSDEN, of Melbourne, 263
  • To HENRY FAWCETT, 265
  • To HENRY KILGOUR, 266
  • To P. A. TAYLOR, 269
  • To Mr. (afterwards Professor) JOHN WESTLAKE. 270
  • To Sir CHARLES DILKE, 271
  • To JEAN ARLÈS-DUFOUR, 273
  • To FREDERIC BOOKER, 275
  • To Mr. JOHN MORLEY, 276
  • To Mr. JOHN MORLEY, 277
  • To HENRY FAWCETT, 278
  • To Mr. LEONARD COURTNEY, 281
  • To Mr. JOHN MORLEY, 282
  • TO ALEXIS MUSTON. 286
  • Chapter XIV - 1871 291
  • TO Mr. JOHN MORLEY. 292
  • To C. L. BRACE, of New York. 293
  • To the New York Liberal Club, 298
  • TO PASQUALE VILLARI. 303
  • TO Mr. MARK H. JUDGE, 306
  • TO WILLIAM MARTIN WOOD, 306
  • TO JOSEPH GILES, of Westport, New Zealand, 308
  • TO C. L. BRACE, of New York. 308
  • To WILLIAM L. ROBINSON, 310
  • To T. CLIFFE LESLIE, 313
  • To CHARLES DUPONT-WHITE, 315
  • To ALEXANDER BAIN. 321
  • Chapter XV 326
  • To Dr. W. B. CARPENTER. 328
  • To PASQUALE VILLARI. 330
  • To GEORG BRANDES, 332
  • To Colonel T. A. COWPER, 336
  • To T. S. BARRETT, 338
  • To EDWIN ARNOLD, 338
  • To J. E. CAIRNES. 340
  • To COSTANTINO BAER, 340
  • To J. E. CAIRNES. 343
  • To Sir CHARLES DILKE, 343
  • To LEWIS SERGEANT, 344
  • To the Secretary of the Nottingham Branch of the International Working Men's Association, 345
  • To W. T. THORNTON. 346
  • TO G. CROOM ROBERTSON, - on the Woman Suffrage Movement 348
  • To J. E. CAIRNES. 349
  • Appendix A - Mill's Diary--January 8 to April 15, 1854 357
  • APPENDIX B - Tract on Right of Property in Land 387
  • Index 397
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