The Letters of John Stuart Mill - Vol. 2

By John Stuart Mill; Hugh S. R. Elliot | Go to book overview

TO JOSEPH GILES, of Westport, New Zealand,

in reply to the question, "How far is a strict and logical philosophy consistent with religious faith?"

AVIGNON, 24th August 1871.

DEAR SIR,--From accidental circumstances your very interesting letter of 18th May 1870 has only just reached me. . . .

1871 -- Aetat. 65.

In regard to your question, whether an unverified hypothesis can rationally serve as a basis for expectation and action, I quite agree with you that it may do so to a certain extent; on subjects on which we cannot hope for knowledge, we may fairly choose among the various hypotheses which are neither self-contradictory nor contradicted by experience, the one which is most beneficial to our moral nature; provided we always remember that its truth is a matter of possibility and of hope, not of belief. Now the cultivation of the idea of a perfectly good and wise being, and of the desire to help the purposes of such a being, is morally beneficial in the highest degree, though the belief that this being is omnipotent, and therefore the creator of physical and moral evil, is as demoralising a belief as can be entertained. Both the copies of your lecture, I fear, have miscarried, but I am very happy to hear of its delivery, and to know that you take a view similar to my own of the most vitally important political and social question of the future, that of the equality between men and women.

I shall always be glad to hear from you, and to tell you my opinion on any subject interesting to you on which I have formed one.


TO EMILE ACOLLAS,

on the limits of the rights of majorities.

AVIGNON, le 20 septembre 1871.

MONSIEUR,--Je vous remercie sincèrement du don de la nouvelle livraison de votre "Manuel du Droit Civil." Jem'en promets beaucoup de plaisir lorsque j'aurai le temps de l'examiner particulièrement. En attendant je suis très content de posséder, dans un volume peu étendu, ce qu'il faut pour connaître et pour comprendre le droit français actuel en matière de mariage, présenté par un penseur qui ne cherche pas à en déguiser les injustices

-308-

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The Letters of John Stuart Mill - Vol. 2
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vi
  • List of Illustrations vii
  • Chapter IX - 1864-1865 1
  • TO ALEXANDER BAIN. 3
  • To Earl GREY, 6
  • To ROBERT HARRISON, 11
  • To MAX KYLLMAN, of Manchester. 14
  • To JAMES BEAL, 16
  • To the Secretary of the Co-operative Plate-Lock Manufactory, Wolverhampton. 18
  • To JAMES BEAL, 21
  • To W. E. HICKSON, the educational writer, 26
  • To J. F. D. MAURICE, 28
  • To PARKE GODWIN, 30
  • To EDWIN CHADWICK, 31
  • To EDWIN L. GODKIN, of New York, 35
  • To MAX KYLLMAN, of Manchester 38
  • To a Correspondent, on a point raised in the "Liberty." 40
  • To RICHARD CONGREVE, on Mill's book on Comte. 42
  • To Professor T. H. HUXLEY, 43
  • To J. BOYD KINNEAR, 44
  • To a Correspondent in Southport, Connecticut 45
  • To a Schoolboy of Fourteen, in reply to a letter asking Mill's opinion on the question, "Is flogging good or bad for boys?" 46
  • Chapter X - 1866-1867 51
  • To the Secretary of the Commons Preservation Society, on the formation of that body. 53
  • To the Speaker's Secretary. 56
  • To JOHN CAMPBELL, of Liverpool. 57
  • From J. A. ROEBUCK to EDWIN CHADWICK, 58
  • To Mrs. CAROLINE LIDDELL, 59
  • TO DARBY GRIFFITH, M.P. 62
  • TO ROBERT PHARAZYN, of New Zealand. 62
  • To Mr. JOHN MORLEY, 63
  • TO DAVID URQUHART, the diplomatist, 66
  • TO DAVID URQUHART 68
  • To EDWIN CHADWICK. 71
  • To H. S. BRANDRETH, 72
  • To the Rev. T. W. TOWLE 74
  • To W. R. CREMER, 77
  • To R. RUSSELL. 79
  • To Archdeacon JOHN ALLEN, on Woman Suffrage. 80
  • TO G. W. SHARP, 81
  • TO WILLIAM WOOD, 82
  • To a Bond Street tradesman, 83
  • To the Rev. STEPHEN HAWTREY, 84
  • TO R. W. EMERSON, - introducing Lord Amberley 85
  • TO W. T. THORNTON, 86
  • TO Mr. OSCAR BROWNING. 87
  • To ALEXANDER BAIN. 90
  • To EDWIN CHADWICK. 92
  • To R. W. EMERSON, 94
  • To E. W. YOUNG, 96
  • To Miss FLORENCE NIGHTINGALE, 97
  • Chapter XI - 1868 106
  • To NICHOLAS KILBURN, 107
  • To JAMES TRASK, 108
  • To PETER DEML, a journalist of Vienna. 109
  • To Mr. GOLDWIN SMITH, 110
  • To a Correspondent, 115
  • To the Secretary of the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals. 116
  • To JAMES HENDERSON, of Glasgow, 119
  • To CHARLES ELIOT NORTON. 121
  • To THOMAS BEGGS, a member of Mill's election committee at Westminster, 122
  • To a Westminster Voter, 123
  • To EDWIN CHADWICK. 126
  • To the Right Hon. E. P. BOUVERIE, M.P. 127
  • To a Correspondent, 128
  • To a Westminster Voter, 133
  • To a Westminster Voter, 136
  • To J. H. FLETCHER, of Northampton, 137
  • To CHARLES BRADLAUGH, 138
  • To ALFRED STEINTHAL, Secretary pro tem of the Manchester Women's Suffrage Committee. 141
  • To GEORGE GROTE. 142
  • To ARCHIBALD MICHIE, of Victoria. 149
  • To the Hon. General Secretary of the Chelsea Work­ ing Men's Parliamentary Electoral Association, 151
  • To a Minister of New Zealand. 154
  • To the President of the Edinburgh Women's Suffrage Society, 155
  • To an Elector of Westminster, 157
  • To JAMES BEAL, 158
  • To Dr. E. L. YOUMANS, 159
  • To W. T. MALLESON, Hon. Sec. of Mill's Election Committee, 163
  • To PHILIP H. RATHBONE, 164
  • TO GEORGE HOWELL, 168
  • Chapter XII - (1869) 169
  • TO D. MCLAREN, M.P., 172
  • TO GEORGE W. SMALLEY, 173
  • TO W. T. THORNTON. 174
  • TO STANDISH O'GRADY, 175
  • TO E. JONES, 177
  • To the Secretary of the American Social Science Association, 178
  • TO HEWETT C. WATSON, 179
  • To a Youth of Fifteen, 180
  • To JAMES BEAL, 181
  • To the President of a Committee, 182
  • To T. CLIFFE LESLIE. 186
  • To PASQUALE VILLARI, 187
  • To HENRY FAWCETT, 190
  • To A. H. LOUIS, 192
  • To Lord AMBERLEY. 193
  • To A. LALANDE, 195
  • To EDWIN CHADWICK, 197
  • TO T. CLIFFE LESLIE, 198
  • To A. M. FRANCIS, of Brisbane, Queensland, on various political questions. 199
  • To A. LALANDE, 200
  • To P. A. TAYLOR, M.P., 202
  • To Dr. CAZELLES, 203
  • To ALEXANDER BAIN. 206
  • To ALEXANDER BAIN, 209
  • To G. CROOM ROBERTSON, 210
  • To Mrs. BEECHER HOOKER, 212
  • To ANDREW REID, of the Land Tenure Reform Association. 213
  • To T. CLIFFE LESLIE; 214
  • To FREDERI MISTRAL, 215
  • To Mrs. P. A. TAYLOR, Secretary of the London National Society for Women's Suffrage. 217
  • To W. T. THORNTON. 218
  • To Dr. CAZELLES, 219
  • To HENRY FAWCETT. 223
  • To JAMES M. BARNARD, of Boston. 226
  • To J. E. CAIRNES, 228
  • To the PRINCESS ROYAL OF PRUSSIA, 230
  • Chapter XIII - 1870 233
  • To PASQUALE VILLARI, on the education of women. 235
  • To Judge CHAPMAN, 235
  • To WILLIAM MALLESON, 237
  • To Lord AMBERLEY, 238
  • To HORACE WHITE, of the Chicago Tribune; on Chinese labour. 239
  • To ALEXANDER CAMPBELL, of Glasgow. 242
  • To FANNY LEWALD-STAHR, 243
  • TO SIR ROBERT COLLIER. 245
  • To Mrs. HICKSON, 245
  • To H. TAINE, 246
  • To a Lady, 249
  • To ALEXANDER BAIN, 250
  • To Sir CHARLES DILKE, 254
  • To GEORGE ADCROFT, 255
  • To J. BOYD KINNEAR, 262
  • To H. K. RUSDEN, of Melbourne, 263
  • To HENRY FAWCETT, 265
  • To HENRY KILGOUR, 266
  • To P. A. TAYLOR, 269
  • To Mr. (afterwards Professor) JOHN WESTLAKE. 270
  • To Sir CHARLES DILKE, 271
  • To JEAN ARLÈS-DUFOUR, 273
  • To FREDERIC BOOKER, 275
  • To Mr. JOHN MORLEY, 276
  • To Mr. JOHN MORLEY, 277
  • To HENRY FAWCETT, 278
  • To Mr. LEONARD COURTNEY, 281
  • To Mr. JOHN MORLEY, 282
  • TO ALEXIS MUSTON. 286
  • Chapter XIV - 1871 291
  • TO Mr. JOHN MORLEY. 292
  • To C. L. BRACE, of New York. 293
  • To the New York Liberal Club, 298
  • TO PASQUALE VILLARI. 303
  • TO Mr. MARK H. JUDGE, 306
  • TO WILLIAM MARTIN WOOD, 306
  • TO JOSEPH GILES, of Westport, New Zealand, 308
  • TO C. L. BRACE, of New York. 308
  • To WILLIAM L. ROBINSON, 310
  • To T. CLIFFE LESLIE, 313
  • To CHARLES DUPONT-WHITE, 315
  • To ALEXANDER BAIN. 321
  • Chapter XV 326
  • To Dr. W. B. CARPENTER. 328
  • To PASQUALE VILLARI. 330
  • To GEORG BRANDES, 332
  • To Colonel T. A. COWPER, 336
  • To T. S. BARRETT, 338
  • To EDWIN ARNOLD, 338
  • To J. E. CAIRNES. 340
  • To COSTANTINO BAER, 340
  • To J. E. CAIRNES. 343
  • To Sir CHARLES DILKE, 343
  • To LEWIS SERGEANT, 344
  • To the Secretary of the Nottingham Branch of the International Working Men's Association, 345
  • To W. T. THORNTON. 346
  • TO G. CROOM ROBERTSON, - on the Woman Suffrage Movement 348
  • To J. E. CAIRNES. 349
  • Appendix A - Mill's Diary--January 8 to April 15, 1854 357
  • APPENDIX B - Tract on Right of Property in Land 387
  • Index 397
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