Teaching Emergent Readers: Collaborative Library Lesson Plans

By Judy Sauerteig | Go to book overview

Mouse Tales

by Arnold Lobel
Reading Level 2.5

Setting:A little mouse house in the woods
Characters:Papa Mouse and seven little mice
Plot:The seven mice children all want a story before bedtime, so Papa Mouse says he will tell a story for each of them.
Summary:Each of the seven chapters in the book is a story that Papa Mouse tells. The seven little mice want a story before bedtime, so Papa Mouse decides to tell them one story for each mouse. The seven chapters in the book are each one of the stories he tells the little mice. The first chapter, [The Wishing Well,] is about a well that is hurt when a little girl throws coins in it. [Clouds] is about a little mouse and his mother picking out shapes in the clouds. The [Very Tall Mouse and Very Small Mouse] see things very differently. Together [The Mouse and the Wind] create several problems that turn out to have a nice ending. [The Journey] is about a mouse trying to visit his mother who uses many interesting ways to get to her house. In the last chapter, [The Old Mouse,] a mouse learns a good lesson about children.
Curriculum Connections:This book lends itself well to a storytelling unit. The stories are short and repetitive, so they are easy to learn. Each child may choose a different story or even make up one. The entire book could also be used as a play. Scripting it would not be difficult. Videotape the students telling the stories and/or acting out the play. Another idea is to use a paper pattern of a mouse with a long tail on which the students may write [mouse tales.] Make a bulletin board with the title [Mouse Tales for Mouse Tails.] Discuss homophones.

ACTIVITIES FOR MEDIA SPECIALISTS

Schema

Ask students the following questions:

Does anyone have a pet mouse? How do you care for it?

Has anyone ever thrown a coin and wished in a wishing well or fountain? Where do you
suppose this custom began?

How many of you have ever sat and watched clouds and tried to find shapes?

One of the stories is about a journey. How many different ways might a person travel?


Visualizing

Ask the students to do the following exercise: One of the stories in the book is about the wind. Imagine you are on a sailboat. What do you see? What do you feel? What do you smell?


Library Skills

Use the book's table of contents to preview the chapters in the book and motivate the students to read. Point out the page numbers and demonstrate to the children how to turn to a specific chapter.

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Teaching Emergent Readers: Collaborative Library Lesson Plans
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction ix
  • And I Mean It, Stanley 1
  • Aunt Eater Loves a Mystery 5
  • Aunt Eater's Mystery Vacation 9
  • Biscuit Goes to School 13
  • The Boston Coffee Party 17
  • Buffalo Bill and the Pony Express 21
  • Cave Boy 25
  • Chang's Paper Pony 29
  • Crocodile and Hen: A Bakongo Folktale 33
  • Danny and the Dinosaur 37
  • Five Silly Fisherman 41
  • The Golly Sisters Go West 45
  • The Great Snake Escape 49
  • The Horse in Harry's Room 53
  • Ice-Cold Birthday 57
  • Little Bear 61
  • Little Bear's Visit 65
  • Mouse Tales 69
  • The Mystery of the Pirate Ghost 73
  • No Fighting, No Biting! 77
  • No Mail for Mitchell 81
  • No More Monsters for Me! 85
  • Oliver 89
  • Oscar Otter 93
  • Owl at Home 97
  • Porcupine's Pajama Party 101
  • Pretty Good Magic 105
  • R Is for Radish 109
  • Sammy the Seal 113
  • Scruffy 117
  • Sleepy Dog 121
  • Small Pig 125
  • The Smallest Cow in the World 129
  • Stanley 133
  • Three by the Sea 137
  • Appendix 141
  • Index 143
  • About the Author 149
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