The First Portuguese Colonial Empire

By Malyn Newitt | Go to book overview

Goa in the Seventeenth Century

ANTHONY DISNEY

In recent years there has been some rekindling of interest in Goa's history, accompanied by a diversity of views on how it may best be approached and written. Should Goa be portrayed as primarily a commercial seaport and therefore be studied mainly within the context of Indian Ocean trade? Or should greater recognition be given to the fact that most Goans lived by subsistence agriculture, and more stress therefore be placed on the life of the villages and the routines of the countryside? On another plane, is it more appropriate to regard Goa as falling firmly within the Portuguese political, economic and cultural orbits from the early sixteenth to the mid twentieth centuries, or should she, on the contrary, be presented as indissolubly part of the mainland, overwhelmingly Indian in character and essence, throughout this period? And if Portuguese rule was never more than superficial and Goa derived little of her distinctiveness from Portuguese associations, what, if anything, gives her a particular identity as compared with neighbouring parts of India?

The answers given to these questions will vary in accordance with the concerns and interests of those through whose eyes Goa is viewed in any particular period. In the seventeenth century, as at other times, there were several distinct perceptions or 'images' of Goa, each held by an identifiable interest group. First there was the Goa of the Portuguese crown and administration which was conceived of as a distant royal possession maintained for its strategic, economic and religious importance to the metropolis, and for imperial prestige. Then there was the Goa of the local elites - European merchants, settlers, and officials in their private entrepreneurial capacities, together with the Indians, mostly Brahmins and Banyas, who collaborated with them in business and administration. To these groups Goa was principally a funnel for commercial enterprise. There was the Goa of the religious establishment,

-85-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The First Portuguese Colonial Empire
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents *
  • Acknowledgements *
  • Introduction 1
  • Prince Henry and the Origins of Portuguese Expansion 9
  • The Estado Da India in Southeast Asia 37
  • Trade in the Indian Ocean and the Portuguese System of Cartazes 69
  • Goa in the Seventeenth Century 85
  • Bibliographical Notes 99
  • Biographical Notes 103
  • Exeter Studies in History 105
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 106

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.