An Introduction to Medical Dance/Movement Therapy: Health Care in Motion

By Sharon W. Goodill | Go to book overview

Foreword

This millennium has laid down the gauntlet of choice for all who serve others, as mothers and fathers, grandparents and grandchildren, as teachers and politicians, healers and pastoral carers, as social and psychological therapists. We can hold back our judgments, can listen, watch, hone our senses, link our genius with humanity's original genius, and dance together. Or we can strut our stuff briefly on life's stage, satiate our egos as performers, then, seeing nothing much changed, give in to cynicism and despair at our collective human plight, our helplessness to reverse the tide.

The choice is simple, but far from easy. Art as psychotherapy, art as medicine, shows us a way, arguably the way.

I confess to being less than objective on the subject of dance. If your body moves, if it vibrates, it dances. When this is the subject, there can be no object: life, everyone's life is dance. The problem is, most of us have forgotten this; forgotten consciously how to dance. Granted, we cannot stop oscillating at a cellular level; but it has become indecent to show our cellular selves. Some say, perhaps, decency at all costs, however high those costs become.

For they are surely high enough; at risk is the sacrifice of our human authenticity and grace. It takes an utterly conscious effort to reclaim it; but reclaim it we must to live our divine truths. What can I say to you, Sharon Goodill, but thank you for your graceful and authentic efforts?

You are deeply compassionate in acknowledging how understandable such helplessness is; understandable but of no use to our survival. To this challenge you offer the antidote of the dance. Let the dance lead us, in faith that our innate skills remain untarnished, stand at attention ready to move, to meet and fulfill every requisite of our work of service.

So you extend your hands to us, offer to lead us back onto the universal dance floor. If we would rather die than expose ourselves to public gaze, nevertheless you remain inspired and undiscouraged. You have sought to teach us, every

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