An Introduction to Medical Dance/Movement Therapy: Health Care in Motion

By Sharon W. Goodill | Go to book overview

two-left-footed one among us, step by step, cadence by cadence, measure by measure, to [trip it as we go,] to slow the tempo and attend, to feel, hear, and see, the full diversity of human oscillation. You delicately require of us that we tap into our cellular memories and uncover the shy place of unity that promises to bring forth human harmony in its wake.

Your scholarship is rigorous, runs wide and deep. You claim it is not exhaustive, yet your comprehensive synthesis of dance/movement therapy (DMT) has located and sourced 100 journals, 200 books and 150 websites, theses and dissertations, at least. You range from an explication of the theoretical base of DMT, through its successes in America and beyond, to your future vision of its evolution in education and research. How exciting to see its emergence from the strictly mental health field to its application to primarily physical ailments, in morphic resonance with the evolution of the more established language, musical, visual and dramatic arts therapies over the past twenty years. Your body of work emerges from the heart of health psychology; and the world is hungry for it.

You take a practical bent, as any dynamic work must, with vignettes, exercises and interviews from your own and others' experience in this field as well as the much larger ones of medicine, neuroscience, nursing and psychology. Your writing is elegant, assured and provocative. And what a wise choice to make your home base for this adventure Jessica Kingsley Publishers, a house of the highest repute for bringing us the spectrum of humanities wedded to humanity, of art in the service of human reemergence.

I am happy to know you; am moved by the deepest gratitude for the gift of your book, this [Project Demonstrating Excellence,] and for the emergence of your intellectual studies, and you yourself, into a larger world. Thank God for it.

John Graham-Pole MBBS MRCP MD
October 2004

-8-

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