An Introduction to Medical Dance/Movement Therapy: Health Care in Motion

By Sharon W. Goodill | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

This textbook represents the culmination of study for a Ph.D. in medical psychology with a concentration in mind/body studies. I have come to this point only with the help and support of many people in my personal and professional life. My gratitude goes first to my remarkable [team] of doctoral committee advisors: Bill McKelvie EdD, and Ira Fritz PhD, of The Union Institute and University, Mario Rodriguez PhD, Robyn Flaum Cruz PhD, Winnie Hohlt PhD, and Carolyn Gordon PhD. They all found the perfect balance of challenge and encouragement – my accomplishment here is testimony to their gifts as teachers and guides.

The inspiration of my colleagues and friends in dance/movement therapy (DMT) brought me to this project. I am deeply and forever grateful to my mentor, Dianne Dulicai, for her belief in me and her exemplary living. The five therapists interviewed for this book entrusted me with the telling of their superb clinical work, and for their time and confidence I am most grateful. Susan Kierr also generously provided excerpts from her unpublished manuscripts on medical DMT work. Two leaders in medical DMT stand out: Susan Cohen and Ilene Serlin. Their clinical work, teachings and writings have provided a model on which I have based my own. I truly believe that without them, we would not be able to claim or define medical DMT as a specialty in the field.

Thanks are due to several others who enriched and supported my doctoral work in meaningful ways. To the courageous and visionary people of the Wellness Community Delaware I am indebted, especially to Program Director Sean Hebbel. My amazing co-workers at Drexel University listened, advised, questioned, and picked up a good deal of work I've left undone: Gayle Gates, Ellen Schelly Hill, Paul Nolan, Gail Wells, Nancy Gerber (my learning partner at The Union Institute and University) and especially Ron Hays, who provided the space and time for this work to be completed. The participants in two pilots of a medical DMT course, in Tel Aviv and in Philadelphia, gave me a chance to try out much of what is in this volume and brought their own fruitful thoughts to the process.

Personal support from a host of loving friends and family members formed the bedrock from which I've worked. The friendship of Mary and Mandell Much, Julie Ritter, Nancy Contel, Cheryl Downer and my sister Virginia Barnhart have sustained me throughout—to say nothing of the help with childrearing and transportation. In every way imaginable my loving husband John Goodill, who is my wind and my anchor, inspired and enabled this pursuit. Our very beautiful daughters, Libbie and Claire, have waited a long time for the completion of this project, and I am humbly grateful for their patience and their pride.

-11-

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