An Introduction to Medical Dance/Movement Therapy: Health Care in Motion

By Sharon W. Goodill | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 2
Psychological Concepts for Medical
Dance/Movement Therapy

There is ample evidence for the premise that in the treatment of medical illnesses, psychosocial factors must be addressed. First, comorbidity of physical and psychiatric illness is substantial. Sobel (1995) reports that [although 10%–20% of patients presenting in a primary care setting have a diagnosable psychiatric disorder, more than 80% have evidence of significant psychological distress] (p.235). Depression is of particular concern with estimates that 10–14 per cent of people in medical inpatient units are depressed (Brody 1998). The prevalence of medical illness among cases of completed suicide ranges from 30–40 per cent, with the greatest risk among patients with HIV/AIDS, multiple sclerosis and brain cancers (Hughes and Kleespies 2001).

In addition to the obvious benefits of reducing depression and the risk of suicide, there can be cost savings in the health care system when psychosocial issues are addressed. One review of cost offset data (Friedman et al. 1995) delineates six different pathways through which psychological, social or educational interventions reduce utilization of conventional medical resources and produce cost savings. These savings have been achieved with conditions as diverse as childhood fever, arthritis, tobacco addiction and post-surgical complications.

Chapter 1 identified health psychology and behavioral medicine research as significant sources of knowledge to inform medical dance/movement therapy (DMT) and other psychosocial support modalities. Here, a number of key constructs will be reviewed, selected for the particular ways that these concepts and phenomena may relate to the premises and practice of medical DMT. Quality of life, stress, coping, self-efficacy and adherence, social support, emotions and affect, positive psychology, spirituality, imagery, and altered states will all be discussed in the pages to follow. The discussion is limited to a rather cursory overview of each. The interested reader is encouraged to pursue the extensive

-33-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
An Introduction to Medical Dance/Movement Therapy: Health Care in Motion
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 240

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.