An Introduction to Medical Dance/Movement Therapy: Health Care in Motion

By Sharon W. Goodill | Go to book overview

Appendix B
Biographies of Foreword Writer and Medical
Dance/Movement Therapy Interviewees

John Graham-Pole MBBS MRCP MD graduated from St Bartholomew's Hospital, University of London, in October 1966. He became a member of the Royal College of Physicians in 1970, and board certified in Child Health and Pediatrics in both Britain and America. He defended his dissertation in medicine at London University in 1978. He has been on the faculty of three universities since 1976, specializing in Pediatric Hematology and Oncology.

He is professor of Pediatrics and affiliate professor of Clinical and Health Psychology at the University of Florida in Gainesville. He co-founded Shands Hospital Arts in Medicine in 1991and is its medical director. He is co-director of the university's Center for the Arts & Health Research and Education, and on the advisory boards of the university's Center for Spirituality and Health and the National Society for the Arts in Healthcare. He directs the Children's Hospice of North Central Florida and the Shands Children's Hospital Palliative Care Consultation Service.

Judith Richardson Bunney MA ADTR served as Director of Dance/Movement Therapy at the District of Columbia Department of Mental Health Services, which includes St. Elizabeths Hospital, considered to be the birthplace of modern dance/movement therapy. She has a private practice working with creative blocks, giving grief workshops, and has expertise as a trainer in team building and group dynamics. She specializes in treating forensic and geropsychiatric clients. A professional DMT for over 45 years, a founding member and Past President of the American Dance Therapy Association, she has taught in several European DMT programs.

Linni Deihl MEd ADTR has worked as a dance/movement therapist since 1964. For 27 years she has taught an intensive summer course in DMT, and also in several university settings. She maintains a private practice specializing in psychogenic somatic disorders, and works in hospice care with cardiac, cancer and AIDS patients. She also works as a choreographer and dance educator.

Susan Imus ADTR GLCMA LCP is currently the Chairperson of the Dance/Movement Therapy Department in the Graduate School at Columbia College Chicago. Susan was one of the founders of the Harvard Community Health Plan's Pain Program in Boston, and Clinical Manager from 1988–94. Her medical DMT background also includes work at the New England Rehabilitation Hospital and Northwest Community Hospital in Des Moines, Iowa. She holds a graduate certificate in art therapy.

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