Jacksonian Antislavery and the Politics of Free Soil, 1824-1854

By Jonathan H. Earle | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

Historians of antebellum politics know that in order to win an election, favors had to be granted, financial support cobbled together, arguments articulated and rearticulated, and debts of gratitude duly acknowledged. The same holds for completing a work of scholarship, and it is my pleasure to thank the many people and institutions that helped me write this book.

Like so many before me, my interest in the antebellum period began while I was an undergraduate at Columbia College. Eric Foner and the late James P. Shenton shared their vast knowledge of the period with me and introduced me to what it meant to be a scholar. At Princeton, James McPherson, John Murrin, Daniel Rodgers, Christine Stansell, and Stephen Aron pushed me in several different (and fruitful) directions, and Sean Wilentz directed my doctoral dissertation with insight, patience, and humanity. He also shared his excellent seats at Yankee Stadium far more often than I deserved. Thanks also to fellow travelers Sharon Block, Walter Johnson, Gary Hewitt, Steve Kantrowitz, Michael Millinder, Henry Yu, and Eric Love, who made spending seven years in suburban New Jersey far less onerous and helped make my work better in various ways.

I was extremely fortunate to land my first academic job at the University of Kansas, and my colleagues here have immeasurably improved this book. Victor Bailey, Angel Kwolek-Folland, Tom Lewin, Eric Love, Jeffrey Moran, Phil Paludan, and Bill Tuttle have all offered their time, excellent advice, and friendship. Ted Wilson is an absolute mensch—he read the entire manuscript at a time when I was short on confidence and declared it "finished." Peter Mancall was the best faculty mentor any junior hire could ever wish for. I will be forever in his debt for the mountains of good advice he gave me after my arrival in Lawrence.

The library and research staffs at the Library of Congress, the National Archives, the New-York Historical Society, the New York State Historical Society, the New York Public Library, Massachusetts Historical Society, the Historical Society of Pennsylvania, the Library Company of Pennsylvania, the New Hampshire Historical Society, Cornell University Libraries, Dartmouth University Libraries, Columbia University Libraries, the University of Kansas Libraries, the Bradford County Historical Society, the Albany County Historical Society, and the Herkimer County Historical Society each

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