Imperial Rule

By Alexei Miller; Alfred J. Rieber | Go to book overview

Justifying Political Power in 19th
Century Europe: the Habsburg
Monarchy and Beyond

MACIEJ JANOWSKI

Two connected problems gave rise to the present essay.1 The first is that of the specific character of imperial legitimization. Did [empires] and [nation states] (however imprecise the division between them) try to justify their power in the same or in different ways?

The second problem is that of specifically [modern] or [pre-modern] modes of legitimizing political power. We would probably tend to treat some arguments as more [traditional] (e.g. divine right of kings) and others as more [modern] (e.g. popular sovereignty). Even casual knowledge of the sources demonstrates, however, that numerous authors tend to [switch] (often in the same paragraph if not the same sentence) from one mode of explanation to another. This, I believe, does require some explanation. Did they fail to notice the internal discrepancy of both modes of argumentation; did they ignore it consciously? Or is our initial supposition not well founded that two separate modes existed?

Before we come to the sources, let us note that Weberian concepts of legitimacy, whatever their value, are of no use here. By [legitimization] or [justification] I simply mean attempts to ground the right to rule in universally accepted principles.2 My task, therefore, is to examine which principles were invoked for this purpose. Treated in this way, the enquiry into the legitimization principles is not an enquiry into how power works; it is rather an interrogation of images; it forms a part of the history of mentalities rather than of political history.

I consciously put aside the whole problem of authorial [intent] in the texts under analysis. The eternal question [did they really mean what they wrote] is irrelevant for my present aim. Metaphor matters, phraseology matters; it is, I believe, perfectly reasonable to assume that a text usually represents the ideas of somebody but not necessarily its author's. Even pure propaganda is usually written to convince somebody, therefore the author must take into account the opinions of his age. Even if, as is undoubtedly often the case, various expressions of loyalty were written only to conform to expectations of the ruling strata, they could still not fail to be influenced by really professed opinions. Cynical sycophants are, as a rule, much more sincere than they themselves perhaps suppose.

-69-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Imperial Rule
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 212

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.