Imperial Rule

By Alexei Miller; Alfred J. Rieber | Go to book overview

The Spanish Empire and its End:
A Comparative View in Nineteenth
and Twentieth Century Europe

SEBASTIAN BALFOUR

A striking feature of bibliography of the Spanish Empire and the consequences of imperial collapse in 1898 is its relatively high degree of self-absorption. This seems to mirror the international isolation of its dynastic elite at the time, reliant until the Spanish–American War on family and religious connections rather than on engagement in the system of international relations for the preservation of its empire. It also reflects a traditional view held among Spaniards and foreigners until recently that Spain had a unique destiny. In the 1930s, W. H. Auden wrote

[…that arid square, that fragment nipped off from hot
Africa, soldered so crudely to inventive Europe…]1

In contrast to this tragic view of Spain, the Spanish Right elaborated the myth of a God-given mission, a [destiny in the universal,] as the obtuse Francoist propaganda put it. This sense of particularity rested on a distorted or invented reading of the past in which the conquistadors had brought the only true religion to most of the world and that world was now disintegrating because it was failing to conform to Christian values. The true identity of Spain could only be renewed by cleansing its inhabitants of nonSpanish ideologies emanating from Europe, such as liberalism, Marxism and Freemasonry.2

In fact, as recent literature has stressed, Spain was always part of Europe and shared common dilemmas and historical processes.3 However, Spain has invariably been compared to its northern European or Mediterranean neighbors. There are many obvious parallels between Spain and Italy, in particular, such as the division between an underdeveloped agrarian south and an industrialized north, a weak, clientele-based state, and an authoritarian response in the 1920s and 30s to the resulting cleavages. But there has been little effort in the historiography of Spain to draw wider parallels. In this chapter, therefore, I want to explore analogies and differences with the pre-1914 central European and Eurasian empires. There are of course many areas where comparison would be fruitful, such as religion, monarchy and the military, to name just a few. But I wish to focus, if only briefly,

-151-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Imperial Rule
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 212

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.