Comparative Federalism: The European Union and the United States in Comparative Perspective

By Anand Menon; Martin Schain | Go to book overview

Preface

This book began as a collaborative project, Comparative Federalism (COMFED), invoking three universities in the United States (New York University, The University of Washington and the University of Pittsburg) and three in Europe (The University of Birmingham, Sciences-Po, Paris and the Universitié Libre de Bruxelles), supported by a grant from the EU–US Program for Cooperation in Higher Education and Vocational Education and Training.1

The collaboration, which lasted for three years, from 2001 to 2005, brought together both graduate students and scholars from the United States and the European Union. The European graduate students, generally specialists on the European Union, came to the three universities in the United States to take courses on American politics and federalism in the United States; their counterparts from the United States, students often interested in American politics, participated in courses and programs on the European Union at the three designated universities in Europe. Both the students and the scholars crossed the Atlantic twice, to participate in conferences on comparative federalism at the University of Birmingham (UK) and at New York University (US). This volume is a product of these two conferences, and benefited in important ways from the rich discussions involving both Faculty and students that characterized each occasion.

The project brought specialists on the developing federal system in Europe together with others who have worked on the federal system in the United States. Our objective was to focus on comparism, and our hopewas that both students and scholars would learn from one another. Similarly, each of the chapters in this book emphasizes a comparative dimension of federalism in the United States and the European Union. We believe that this transatlantic project worked well in training graduate students and in bringing together

1 European Commission EU/US Program, Agreement 20011281; FIPSE grant PII6J010020,
EC–US Cooperation Program.

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