Folktales of the Jews - Vol. 2

By Dan Ben-Amos | Go to book overview

24
The Redemption of Captives

TOLD BY RAPHAEL HERBEST TO MOSHE RIVLIN

In the great synagogue of Vilna, one Rosh Hashanah many years ago, when the rebbe of the synagogue, the righteous Rebbe Joshua (of blessed memory), got up to blow the shofar*—precisely at that moment Satan entered, and the rebbe could not get a sound out of the shofar, no matter how hard he tried. This astonished everyone, because the righteous Rebbe Joshua had been blowing the shofar for more than fifty years and never before had he been unable to get a sound out of it. What was going on here, the people wondered. What was the reason? There had to be something here. It could not be a matter of chance. An hour passed and then two, but he was still unable to blow the shofar. Other people tried, but none of them could produce a sound either.

When the righteous Rebbe Joshua saw what was happening, he begged the congregation's indulgence. He said he hoped that he would be able to blow the shofar soon, but asked to go off by himself so that he could try to find out why none of them could get a note out of it. The congregation agreed to his request, because of their reverence for the righteous man.

The righteous Rebbe Joshua went home quickly, because he knew the congregation was waiting for him, to pray alone for the short period he had asked them to wait for him. When he arrived in front of his house he saw Monish, the poor Jewish cobbler, the simplest Jew in all of Vilna, an unlettered ignoramus who was never friendly to anyone, with a crying young girl in his arms. He was comforting her and offering her sweets. When the righteous Rebbe Joshua saw this he remembered that he had encountered the same scene on his way to the synagogue that morning, but then it had not occurred to him to ask Monish the cobbler what was going on. Now he wondered whether this was why he could not blow the shofar.

So the righteous Rebbe Joshua went over to Monish the cobbler. "What's the matter?" he asked him. "Why is the girl crying?"

*Ram's horn, traditionally blown for celebration and communication, most notably on the High Holy
Days—Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur.

-186-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Folktales of the Jews - Vol. 2
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 624

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.