Folktales of the Jews - Vol. 2

By Dan Ben-Amos | Go to book overview

39
The Poisoned Cake

TOLD BY DVORA FUS

The nobleman's castle was in a village near the shtetl. His widow lived there with her only son. The steward and his assistants handled all her business affairs; her son was at school in a distant city. He never came home except during the summer vacation, when his sole pleasure was to go hunting in the nearby forests.

The son was the noblewomen's only comfort, and she expected that he would bring her great honor and satisfaction. On his account, she was extremely devout, to the point of fanaticism. Every Sunday, she went to church and distributed very large sums in alms. She never turned away a beggar and was accordingly much beloved in the village.

Among those to whom she gave alms was a certain Jewish woman, who came to the noblewoman once a week and received what she needed for an entire week. But this Jewish woman never thanked the noblewoman. Instead, she repeated the same Yiddish phrase: "Everything you're doing—you're doing it for yourself and not for me." (In other words, the reward of a good deed is a good deed,* and the true reward is tendered in Heaven.)

The noblewoman did not understand what the Jewess was saying, of course, and kept giving her what she needed every week. Many years passed this way. Throughout this time, the son came home each year for his holiday, and he grew into a handsome young man. He continued to go hunting every summer when he was home. The Jewish woman continued to receive her weekly stipend from the noblewoman.

The noblewoman was curious to know what the Jewess was saying. When she finally found out, she was furious. She decided to pay back this ungrateful Jewish woman, who had never once said thank you to her benefactor. The next time the Jewish woman came she would give her a poisoned cake.

*Mishnah Avot 4:2.

-282-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Folktales of the Jews - Vol. 2
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 624

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.