Folktales of the Jews - Vol. 2

By Dan Ben-Amos | Go to book overview

Narrators

Adar, Motel. (1912–1964). Born in Rudnik, Poland, a shtetl in western Galicia, into a Hasidic family. His father died when he was ten years old, but his mother made every effort that he would continue to receive a traditional religious education. Nevertheless, at a very young age he had to start working in the basket-making industry to help his mother care for the family. As a young adult he joined the He-Ḥalutz-Deror movement, preparing himself to immigrate to the Land of Israel. He was a shepherd in kibbutz Tel Yosef, and later in kibbutz Betha-Shittah. He loved the Hasidic tradition and read Hasidic books, particularly tales, extensively. After his death his family deposited forty-four tales that he had recorded in the IFA.

Alt man, Leon. (b. 1906). Born in a village near Bacau, Romania, in the Moldavia region. Further biographical information is unavailable.

Ament, Gitshe. (dates unavailable). Born in Sanok, Poland, she was fifteen years old when she told and sang her stories and songs, most of which she learned from her mother, a poultry trader in the market.

Armon (Kastenbaum), Ḥayyim Dov. (b. 1899). Born in Dambrowa, Poland, and immigrated to the Land of Israel in 1939. He lived in Tel Aviv, where he worked in the Post-Office Bank. A religiously observant person and an intellectual, he organized the "Maimonides Circle," a home study circle that met weekly for the examination of issues in Jewish philosophy. He edited two books.

Ben-Amos, Zalman "Castrol". (1898–1983). Born in Minsk, Belarus, and educated there and in the yeshivah of Odessa. During and after World War I, he taught in a rural Jewish school in Lithuania, where he met Rivka Feinzilber, whom he married in 1922. Both were ardent Zionists and immigrated to thenPalestine two years later; after living in Jerusalem for six months, they moved to Tel Aviv, where they remained until 1930, when they moved to Petah-Tikvah, with the hope for a more regular employment. In Jerusalem, Tel Aviv, and PetahTikvah, Ben-Amos worked constructing roads and building houses. After moving to Petah-Tikvah, he began working in the quarries of Migdal Zeddek, where he joined the Jewish auxiliary police (ghafirs) during the riots of 1936–1939. During World War II, he worked in a factory that served the war effort; and after the war, he became a Solel laborer. In 1955, he suffered a major head injury when a car hit him from behind; after recovering, he was forced to retire. All of his life, he was active in community life and was a member of numerous com-

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