Paul on Marriage and Celibacy: The Hellenistic Background of 1 Corinthians 7

By Will Deming | Go to book overview

3 Stoic and Cynic Elements
in 1 Corinthians 7

A KNOWLEDGE OF STOIC AND CYNIC discussions of marriage is essential for understanding Paul's statements on marriage and celibacy in 1 Corinthians 7 — this thesis, which we will shortly put to the test, is neither new, as indicated in chapter 1, nor unreasonable. The Stoic-Cynic marriage debate, as we saw in chapter 2, flourished among Paul's philosophical contemporaries, and Corinth was a center of philosophical thought in the Hellenistic world, situated, so to speak, at a crossroad of other philosophical centers. With Rome to the northwest, Alexandria to the southeast, and Athens some fifty miles away on its eastern flank, this cosmopolitan port city regularly caught the intellectual breezes that circulated in the Roman Empire.1 The prospect of Paul finding an audience at Corinth attuned to Stoic and Cynic arguments about marriage was therefore quite good. As for the apostle himself, a growing number of investigations have demonstrated the similarity between Paul's theology and ministry and that of Stoic and Cynic moralists of his day,2 and several schol-

1. According to Acts, several early leaders in the church at Corinth hailed from Rome and
Alexandria (18:2, 24; 19:1; cf. 1 Cor. 1:12; 3:4, 5, 6, 22; 4:6; 16:12), and Paul came to Corinth via Ath-
ens, where he encountered Stoics and Epicureans (Acts 17:18; 18:1).

2. Especially important in this respect is Abraham J. Malherbe, Paul and the Popular Philoso-
phers
(Minneapolis: Fortress, 1989), and Malherbe, Paul and the Thessalonians: The Philosophic
Tradition of Pastoral Care
(Philadelphia: Fortress, 1987). See also D. A. DeSilva, "Paul and the
Stoa: A Comparision,"JETS 38 (1994): 549–64; Troels Engberg-Pedersen, Paul and the Stoics (Lou-
isville: Westminster/John Knox, 2000); J. Paul Sampley, ed., Paul in the Greco-Roman World: A
Handbook
(Harrisburg, Penn.: Trinity Press International, 2003); Gerd Theissen, The Social Set-
ting of Pauline Christianity: Essays on Corinth
, edited and introduction by John H. Schütz (Phila-
delphia: Fortress, 1982), 39–47; Robert M. Grant, Early Christianity and Society: Seven Studies (San

-105-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Paul on Marriage and Celibacy: The Hellenistic Background of 1 Corinthians 7
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 271

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.