Acknowledgments

In 1992 my parents gave me a leather-bound Webster's dictionary with an in- scription on the inside cover that reads, "To use in the pursuit of knowledge and ideas to enrich your life." Even though the book has become somewhat outdated, especially as lexicons of digital literature go, its message has not, and after crossing continents and oceans, it still sits beside my desk. I thank them—both distinguished educators in their own right—for their immeasur- able support in putting this work together. Effusive thanks also go to Bridgit, who is truly an awesome companion with a smile that remedies all.

Portions of chapters contained in this book have appeared previously in online publications. Grateful acknowledgment goes to Jan Baetens, editor of Image & Narrative, for permission to reprint portions of chapter 2, "Net- work Vistas: Folding the Cognitive Map," that appear under the same title in that journal, and to Joseph Tabbi, editor of the electronic book review, for supporting republication of earlier portions of chapters 3 and 4 and, more generally, for welcoming me into the ebr community. I also thank John New- ton, at the University of Canterbury; Brian Opie, at Victoria University; and Brian McHale, at the Ohio State University for their careful reading and in- valuable insight, which greatly contributed to shaping this project. Finally, I'd like to acknowledge the fine work done by all those at The University of Alabama Press involved in bringing this work to publication.

-ix-

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Reading Network Fiction
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction 1
  • 1: The Time and Time Again of Network Fiction 15
  • 2: Network Vistas 44
  • 3: Returning in Twilight - Joyce's Twilight, a Symphony 72
  • 4: Tending the Garden Plot 94
  • 5: Fluid or Overflowing - The Unknown and *water Writes Always in *plural 124
  • 6: Mythology Proceeding - Morrissey's the Jew's Daughter 160
  • Concluding Movements 188
  • Appendix 193
  • Notes 197
  • References 221
  • Index 239
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