Out of the Depths: Women's Experience of Evil and Salvation

By Ivone Gebara; Ann Patrick Ware | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 5
god for women

My God, my God, why have you abandoned me?

–Mark 15:34

According to the early Christian community, this verse from a psalm was the last cry of the man Jesus on the cross, but this could also be the daily cry of so many people, particularly women, in various parts of the world. The experience of abandonment may best characterize the life of most women considered in this study— abandonment by reason of the evil they have undergone, the sufferings they have endured, the scramble for ways to survive. At the same time, it is an abandonment accompanied by something very fragile that still keeps life going and therefore is of interest at the level of women's experience and also at the theological level.

Here we may ask: How can we develop a phenomenology of the experience of God from a feminine perspective? Using the phenomenological method of letting situations speak for themselves, we look to situations wherein women's cries to God are the loudest and most frequent. Then we shall try to sketch an outline, knowing full well that any interpretation will be only a pale understanding of what women have endured.

This work is not a treatise on God but a discussion of what women experience when they say [God.] Further, it is not a general treatment of this experience but a study of examples from literature and actual testimonies. What can we make of these experiences when women cry out to God? What this interpretive study tries to convey is life in its many forms and its complexity. We have to understand, beginning with women's words and pleas,

-145-

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Out of the Depths: Women's Experience of Evil and Salvation
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Translator's Note vii
  • Introduction 1
  • Chapter 1 - Women's Experience of Evil 13
  • Chapter 2 - Evil and Gender 61
  • Chapter 3 - The Evil Women Do 95
  • Chapter 4 - Women's Experience of Salvation 109
  • Chapter 5 - God for Women 145
  • Epilogue 175
  • Notes 183
  • A Select Bibliography 199
  • Index 205
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