Out of the Depths: Women's Experience of Evil and Salvation

By Ivone Gebara; Ann Patrick Ware | Go to book overview

epilogue

Now that I have come to the end of this work, the words of Phoolan Devi help me review my reflective journey and express my hope for a feminist approach to the problem of evil.

All my life I have asked God the same questions: Was I born
to suffer? Did I come into the world to be a slave? God of the
world, why wasn't I born an animal?

Animals live in freedom and respect in our Hindu society.
Even the dog wandering around in search of food has not
lived my lot.

If God had made me a man, I would not have had to face
this dreadful destiny. It is because I am a woman that I have
been humiliated to the depths of my soul.1

The last testimony is that of Phoolan Devi, a woman with bloody scars, once queen of bandits and later a deputy of the Indian Parliament.2 Her testimony brings to mind the reason for this work: the silent oppression endured by so many women, especially those of Latin America. Many women, especially the poorest, are so despised that they ultimately despise themselves as human beings. In light of their lives, we must re-theologize and re-philosophize the problem of evil and salvation. We need to think about their difficulties and their rescue that they may eventually become grateful for being female, rather than wishing that they had been born male. And last, we need to denounce the anti-feminism present in our societies and churches, especially that anti-feminism

-175-

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Out of the Depths: Women's Experience of Evil and Salvation
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Translator's Note vii
  • Introduction 1
  • Chapter 1 - Women's Experience of Evil 13
  • Chapter 2 - Evil and Gender 61
  • Chapter 3 - The Evil Women Do 95
  • Chapter 4 - Women's Experience of Salvation 109
  • Chapter 5 - God for Women 145
  • Epilogue 175
  • Notes 183
  • A Select Bibliography 199
  • Index 205
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