The Colonial Unconscious: Race and Culture in Interwar France

By Elizabeth Ezra | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 5
Difference in Disguise
Paul Morand's Black Magic

La Terre cesse d'étre un drapeau aux couleurs violentes: c'est l'âge sale
du métis.

Paul Morand, quoted in Paul Morand: Le sourire du hara-kiri, by
Pascal Louvrier and Eric Canal-Forgues

Like Josephine Baker, Paul Morand played a highly visible role in French culture of the interwar period; nevertheless, his work is largely overlooked today. In a reflection of the turbulent partnership between literature and politics in twentieth-century France, his canonical stature has waxed and waned according to the shifting parameters of political—and critical—correctness. One of the most popular writers of the 1920s and 1930s, Morand was praised by Celine as [le premier de nos écrivains qui ait jazzé la langue française] [the first of our writers to jazz the French language] (cited in Collomb 1993,46); the neologism, in Céline's original emphasis, pointed as much to the jazz age in which and

-129-

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The Colonial Unconscious: Race and Culture in Interwar France
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations ix
  • Preface xi
  • Introduction - Colonial Culture 1
  • Chapter 1 - Colonialism Exposed 21
  • Chapter 2 - Raymond Roussel and the Structure of Stereotype 47
  • Chapter 3 - Cannibals in Babylon René Crevel's Allegories of Exclusion 75
  • Chapter 4 - A Colonial Princess Josephine Baker's French Films 97
  • Chapter 5 - Difference in Disguise Paul Morand's Black Magic 129
  • Epilogue - Black-Blanc-Beur 145
  • Notes 155
  • Bibliography 161
  • Index 171
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