The Deadly Truth: A History of Disease in America

By Gerald N. Grob | Go to book overview

Notes

PROLOGUE

1. René Dubos, The Dreams of Reason: Science and Utopias (New York: Columbia University Press, 1961), p. 71.

2. Paul B. Beeson, "Changes in Medical Therapy during the Past Half Century," Medicine, 59 (1980): 79–85.

3. James Le Fanu, The Rise and Fall of Modern Medicine (New York: Carroll & Craf, 1999), especially pp. xv-xvii and 22–23.

4. William B. Schwartz, Life without Disease: The Pursuit of Medical Utopia (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1998), p. 149.

5. Susan Sontag, Illness as Metaphor (New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 1978), pp. 64–66.

6. Dubos, Dreams of Reason, pp. 84–85. See also his classic and influential Mirage of Health: Utopias, Progress, and Biological Change (New York: Harper & Brothers, 1959).

7. David J. Weatherall, Science and the Quiet Art: The Role of Medical Research in Health Care (New York: W. W. Norton, 1995), pp. 123–22.4.

8. Ibid., pp. 63, 167–173.

9. See especially Renée C. Fox and Judith P. Swazy, Spare Parts: Organ Replacement in American Society (New York: Oxford University Press, 1992), pp. 3–10, 204–210.

10. See Linda T. Cohen, Janet M. Corrigan, and Molla S. Donaldson, eds., To Err Is Human: Building a Safer Health System (Washington, D.C.: National Academy Press, 2000), pp. 26–48.

11. The traditional distinction between acute infectious and chronic degenerative diseases is somewhat spurious. Miliary tuberculosis, for example, can

-277-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Deadly Truth: A History of Disease in America
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Prologue 1
  • Chapter 1 - The Pre-Columbians 7
  • Chapter 2 - New Diseases in the Americas 26
  • Chapter 3 - Colonics of Sickness 48
  • Chapter 4 - The Promise of Enlightened Health 70
  • Chapter 5 - Threats to Urban Health 96
  • Chapter 6 - Expanding America, Declining Health 121
  • Chapter 7 - Threats of Industry 153
  • Chapter 8 - Stopping the Spread of Infection 180
  • Chapter 9 - The Discovery of Chronic Illness 217
  • Chapter 10 - No Final Victory 243
  • Notes 277
  • Index 339
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 349

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.