Leadership Capacity for Lasting School Improvement

By Linda Lambert | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

First, I wish to thank the remarkable educators in Alberta and Manitoba, Canada; Kansas City, Kansas; Scottsbluff, Nebraska; Columbus, Ohio; Carlisle, Pennsylvania; Wauwatosa, Wisconsin; Richmond, San Leandro, Cupertino, Hayward, Oakland, Hickman, and Saratoga, California; and Melbourne, Australia. The educators in these districts, towns, and schools provided the examples and stories that bring this book to life. Their commitment and energy represent our best hope for educating all students well.

I have met some new colleagues during the course of my research—individuals whose questions and writings have helped to frame the issues of leadership capacity. In this regard, I wish to thank Gus Jacobs, Rosemary Foster, Greg Netzer, Ann Conzemius, Jan O'Neil, Bill Bragg, Marty Krovetz, and my longtime colleague and friend, Mary Gardner.

I am especially touched that Ann Lieberman agreed to write the foreword for this book. Her work in collaboration, teacher leadership, and networking has been a constant inspiration throughout the years. Thank you, Ann.

Finally, I want to thank my two editors. My veteran editor Morgan Lambert—also my friend, colleague, mentor, and husband—challenges me with tender wisdom to think deeply about what I observe and the conclusions that I draw. My new editor, Anne Meek of ASCD, has been a sparkling, supportive, and incisive guide in the development of this book.

-xi-

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