Leadership Capacity for Lasting School Improvement

By Linda Lambert | Go to book overview

About the Author

Linda Lambert is professor emeritus at California State University, Hayward. She began her career in the field of probation, where she soon discovered that influencing education held more promise for influencing the lives of children. Since then, she has worked as a teacher leader, a principal, a district and county professional development director, the coordinator of a Principals' Center and Leadership Academy, the designer of four major restructuring programs, an international consultant, and a professor.

In the late 1980s and throughout the 1990s, Linda helped set up a National Curriculum Center in Egypt and worked in leadership development with thousands of principals, teachers, and district personnel in the United States, Canada, Mexico, Australia, and Thailand. She is the lead author of The Constructivist Leader (first and second editions, 1995 & 2002), Who Will Save Our Schools: Teachers as Constructivist Leaders (1997), author of Building Leadership Capacity in Schools (1998), and coauthor of Developing Leadership Capacity for School Improvement (2003), as well as of numerous articles and book chapters. Linda's research and consultancy interests include leadership, leadership capacity, professional and organizational development, and school and district restructuring.

Linda and her husband, Morgan, have five children, eleven grandchildren, and one greatgrandchild. They alternate their residence between Oakland and The Sea Ranch, California. You may reach her by e-mail at Linlambert@aol.com, by phone at 510–5698840, or by fax at 510–569-8858.

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