Psychology and Law: An Empirical Perspective

By Neil Brewer; Kipling D. Williams | Go to book overview

Index
Ability factor, juror cognition, 282–284
Aboriginal offenders, 457
Accessibility of memory
conceptual aspects, 104–105
postevent information effect on, 111, 227– 228
Accountability, and jury motivation, 298–299
"Acquiescence bias," 17
Acquittals
judges' agreement/disagreement, 414
and jury decision making, 349–350
jury nullification link, 389–390
"leniency bias" in juries, 368
Active role playing, mock jurors, 342, 354–355
Actuarial data
jury processing biases, 468
of recidivism risk, 447–448
Admonishments to disregard, 391–393
effectiveness, 391–393
inadmissible evidence remedy, 391
Advertising, false memory creation, 241–242
Affect-control theory, and sentencing decisions, 470
Affirmation bias, 17
African American defendants
judicial sentencing biases, 466
and jury decisions, 386–388
lineup cross-race effect, 190–191
race salience factor, 388
Age factors
eyewitness identification, 186–188, 190
judicial sentencing biases, 466
"Aggravating" circumstances, jury instruction, 416
Aggravating factors, and sentencing, 461–462
Alcohol intoxication, and memory reporting, 131
Alford plea, 446
Algebraic approach, juror decision making, 371– 372
Alternative hypotheses, in interviewing, 20–21
Ambivalence, liars versus truth tellers, 68–69
Amnesia, simulated, detection of, 76
Anchored narratives, in credible stories, 73
Anchoring bias, judges, 468
Apodaca, Cooper & Madden v. Oregon (1972), 369
Apology to victims, value of, 458–460
"Appeal to ignorance" fallacy, 341
Appeals, pattern instruction advantage, 429
Appellate courts, jury charge appeals, 409, 429
Archival analysis, versus self-report, 345
Argument characteristics. See also Closing arguments
central-processing tactics, 288
in juror persuasion, 287–293, 296–297
number effects, 296–297
primacy effect interaction, 301–302
strength effects, 287–292
succinctness effects, 296
Arizona v. Fulminante (1991), 377
Arousal, in deception detection, 56–60
Associative network theory, false memories, 245–246
Attention
memory encoding factor, 100–101
and postevent information effects, 111, 227– 228
stress effects on, 237–238
Attitudes
behavior congruency, 278–281
compliant behavior effect on, 310–311
elaboration likelihood model, 281–297
in judicial decision making, 469
and juror persuasion tactics, 278–297
levels-of-processing influences, 284–285
and memory reconstruction, 115–116
pretrial publicity impact on, 266–272
and message–attitude discrepancy, 270
self-monitoring effect on, 281
specificity of, 280
temporary versus stable, 278–281
tripartite model, 278

-501-

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