Churchill: The Unexpected Hero

By Paul Addison | Go to book overview

hero, but afterwards his reputation went into a decline from which it has never entirely recovered. The heroes of one generation can be unmade by the next, and it remained to be seen whether Churchill would win the battle of the history books.

When I began historical research, Churchill was still alive. My subject was the transition from the Chamberlain to the Churchill governments, but I knew little of Churchill beyond his fame as a war leader. A few months later, on the afternoon of Saturday, 30 January 1965, I stood in the hushed and reverent crowd as his funeral train, the coffin draped in the Union Jack, passed slowly through Oxford station. I was awestruck: the ground seemed to tremble beneath our feet. The following Saturday afternoon I was waiting for a train at the station when I noticed a frail and elderly man sitting alone on a bench with a little battered suitcase. It was Churchill's wartime deputy, Clement Attlee, who had been one of the pall-bearers of his coffin. No one on the crowded platform was taking any notice of him. When his train came in he found it difficult to climb aboard and a porter came forward to give him a helping hand. I said to the porter: 'That was Mr Attlee, wasn't it?' 'I think it was', he replied.

Attlee was the giant-killer who had defeated Churchill in the 1945 general election. His Labour government had constructed a new post-war settlement at home and abroad while Churchill languished in opposition. He had even nationalized the railway which carried Churchill on his final journey. Attlee was a thoroughly comprehensible type of Englishman who applied the service ethic of the public schools and the officer class to the Labour party and the socialist cause. There was very little mystery about him and no hint of charisma. Churchill was evidently something else. His exuberant image, complete with V-sign, giant cigar, and outlandish costumes, was as familiar

-2-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Churchill: The Unexpected Hero
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgements vii
  • Contents ix
  • Abbreviations xi
  • Prologue 1
  • One - The Youngest Man in Europe, 1874–1901 7
  • Two - The Renegade, 1901–1911 29
  • Three - The Lilliput Napoleon, 1911–1915 57
  • Four - The Winstonburg Line, 1915–1924 82
  • Five - Respectability Won and Lost, 1924–1939 112
  • Six - The Making of a Hero, 1939–1945 153
  • Seven - Climbing Olympus, 1945–1965 216
  • Eight - Churchill Past and Present 246
  • Notes 255
  • Bibliography 275
  • Index 287
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 308

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.