Churchill: The Unexpected Hero

By Paul Addison | Go to book overview

SIX
The Making of a Hero,
1939–1945

On 15 March 1939 German troops marched into Prague and the Czechoslovak state ceased to exist. The moral case for the Munich agreement––that Hitler's aims were limited to the incorporation of Germans in the Reich, that a just grievance against the Treaty of Versailles was being redressed, that appeasement would bring 'peace in our time'––collapsed overnight. By the same token Churchill's analysis of Munich was vindicated. The argument which had been employed so often to justify his exclusion from office––that he lacked judgement––began to rebound against Chamberlain and his colleagues. Was it not they who had lacked judgement? Had not Sir Samuel Hoare, speaking a few days before the invasion of Prague, conjured up the prospect of a new Golden Age of prosperity for the world? At long last Churchill was in a position where, assisted by the tide of opinion now flowing against appeasement, he could begin to turn the tables on his critics.

Shifting his ground, Chamberlain authorized a British guarantee to Poland, but his estimate of Churchill was unchanged and he had no wish to include him in the government. His views were

-153-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Churchill: The Unexpected Hero
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgements vii
  • Contents ix
  • Abbreviations xi
  • Prologue 1
  • One - The Youngest Man in Europe, 1874–1901 7
  • Two - The Renegade, 1901–1911 29
  • Three - The Lilliput Napoleon, 1911–1915 57
  • Four - The Winstonburg Line, 1915–1924 82
  • Five - Respectability Won and Lost, 1924–1939 112
  • Six - The Making of a Hero, 1939–1945 153
  • Seven - Climbing Olympus, 1945–1965 216
  • Eight - Churchill Past and Present 246
  • Notes 255
  • Bibliography 275
  • Index 287
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 308

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.