Guns, Violence, and Identity among African American and Latino Youth

By Deanna L. Wilkinson | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

My list of debts from this project is long. Financial support for this work was provided by grants from the Harry Frank Guggenheim, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Insitute of Justice, and the National Science Foundation. Lois Mock, Jim Mercy, and Mary Alice Yates provided meaningful feedback on the development of the study. In addition, the manuscript could not have been completed without considerable support from the William Penn Foundation and Jean Hunt in particular. The opinions are solely those of the author. Special thanks to Jeffrey Fagan, principal investigator, for his support, suggestions and commmets.

Most importantly, I am deeply indebted to the young men who were willing to share their life histories with the interview team. I hope that my interpretations and presentation of their stories provide insights that help shape policy and practice.

I would like to acknowledge the many contributions of my field research staff. This project would not have been possible without them. Rich McClain, Whetsel Wade, Davon Battee, David Tufino, and Jason Mercado inspired me with their resilience and personal growth during the project. I am grateful for the opportunity to get to know and care about five extraordinary individuals. Each member brought something special and unique to this study. They showed considerable courage to do something visible and different from what most individuals their age were doing in these neighborhoods. They lived many of the experiences described in this book and continue to struggle for survival in these dangerous neighborhoods, they call home. I think my understanding of the social worlds of inner-city adolescent males was enriched most through my conversations and debates with the interviewers. Week after week the stories poured in about what my field interviewers observed, experienced, heard about, feared, and/or grieved. The frequency of violent events in their neighborhoods shocked and outraged me.

I gratefully acknowledge the research assistance of Marlene Pantin, Ed Wilkinson, Lori Davie, Alex Figueroa, Valli Rajah, Adam Trister, Jorge Nunez, Wilson Cruz, Michael Perez, Richard Vargas, and Javier Tufino. In addition, I am grateful to Christopher Tennant and Keith Gooch for not being afraid to criticize my work and helping me to improve my writing. The staff at Friends of Island Academy

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