Guns, Violence, and Identity among African American and Latino Youth

By Deanna L. Wilkinson | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 5
Peers, Social Networks, And Other
Affiliations

In the criminological literature, adolescent peer culture often is blamed for “creating” criminal or deviant behavior. This section explores the nature of peer relationships by summarizing respondents' descriptions of their “bonds” to peers, frequently referred to as “peeps,” “boys,” ”family,” or “brothers.” Recurring themes include: solidarity, respect, and trust. The types of activities that youth enjoy together shape friendship bonds. Belonging to a clique or street-corner group fulfills a variety of needs for many young men, including protection, income generation, adventure, companionship, love, identity formation, partying, and the social construction of violent events. This section focuses specifically on the protection afforded by friendships that are described as part of the peer group process. Many of the violent events, both gun and non-gun, described were embedded in group processes. The majority of youth in this study were not members of formal youth gangs. Although much of the violent behavior described occurred with other youth this activity was not part of an organized youth gang structure. The study neighborhoods are not areas where youth gangs are prominent. These very basic descriptions further explicate the social context of violence among urban male youth.

The majority of our respondents were closely associated to one or, more typically, several young males who live in the same or surrounding blocks. As one respondent explained “your block is where the love is at.” Friendships or associations develop out of geographic proximity, common interests and values, and joint experiences over several years' time. Neighborhood-based group solidarity seems to be especially important throughout the teenage years and early twenties. The majority of our sample belonged to tightly knit peer groups and described their social relations accordingly.10 Some reported being part of smaller networks including dyads and triads. Others reported being on the fringe of larger peer networks and a few respondents described

10 The chain referral sampling strategy used in this study would obviously skew
the sample toward individuals who are embedded in social networks. There is
some heterogeneity on this dimension; however, the majority of respondents
were affiliated with a neighborhood-based group of similarly situated youths.

-99-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Guns, Violence, and Identity among African American and Latino Youth
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 299

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.