Mostly Harmless Econometrics: An Empiricist's Companion

By Joshua D. Angrist; Jörn-Steffen Pischke | Go to book overview

Chapter 3
Making Regression Make Sense

]Let us think the unthinkable, let us do the undoable.

Let us prepare to grapple with the ineffable itself,
and see if we may not eff it after all.]

Douglas Adams, Dirk Gently's Holistic Detective Agency

Angrist recounts:

I ran my first regression in the summer of 1979 between my
freshman and sophomore years as a student at Oberlin College.
I was working as a research assistant for Allan Meltzer and
Scott Richard, faculty members at Carnegie-Mellon University,
near my house in Pittsburgh. I was still mostly interested in a
career in special education, and had planned to go back to
work as an orderly in a state mental hospital, my previous
summer job. But Econ 101 had got me thinking, and I could
also see that at the same wage rate, a research assistant's hours
and working conditions were better than those of a hospital
orderly. My research assistant duties included data collection
and regression analysis, though I did not understand regression
or even statistics at the time.

The paper I was working on that summer (Meltzer and
Richard, 1983) is an attempt to link the size of governments
in democracies, measured as government expenditure over
GDP, to income inequality. Most income distributions have
a long right tail, which means that average income tends to be
way above the median. When inequality grows, more voters
find themselves with below-average incomes. Annoyed by this,
those with incomes between the median and the average may
join those with incomes below the median in voting for fiscal
policies that take from the rich and give to the poor. The size
of government consequently increases.

-27-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Mostly Harmless Econometrics: An Empiricist's Companion
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Figures vii
  • Tables ix
  • Preface xi
  • Acknowledgments xv
  • Organization of This Book xvii
  • Part I - Preliminaries 1
  • Chapter 1 - Questions About Questions 3
  • Chapter 2 - The Experimental Ideal 11
  • Part II - The Core 25
  • Chapter 3 - Making Regression Make Sense 27
  • Chapter 4 - Instrumental Variables in Action: Sometimes You Get What You Need 113
  • Chapter 5 - Parallel Worlds: Fixed Effects, Differences-In-Differences, and Panel Data 221
  • Part III - Extensions 249
  • Chapter 6 - Getting a Little Jumpy: Regression Discontinuity Designs 251
  • Chapter 7 - Quantile Regression 269
  • Chapter 8 - Nonstandard Standard Error Issues 293
  • Last Words 327
  • Acronyms and Abbreviations 329
  • Empirical Studies Index 335
  • References 339
  • Index 361
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 373

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.