The Supreme Gods of the Bosporan Kingdom: Celestial Aphrodite and the Most High God

By Yulia U. Ustinova | Go to book overview

CHAPTER THREE
THE MOST HIGH GOD AND SABAZIOS

2.3.1 The Expulsion of the Jews from Rome and the Cult of Sabazios

Intensive connections between Theos Hypsistos and Sabazios are assumed on two different grounds. According to the approach suggested by Cumont (1906) and later adopted by several scholars,1 Jews (GGR 2: 662; Bickerman 1958: 147–149; Macrea 1959; 329–330; Leon 1960: 3; Picard 1961: 146–147; Siegert 1973: 144; Stern 1974–84, 1: 359) or Jewish sympathizers (Hengel 1974, 1: 263; Simon 1976: 53–55; Feldman 1992: 379) associated Sabazios with either Sabaoth, or Sabbath, or both. For those who consider Theos Hypsistos the Greek version of the Old Testament god, the logical inference is the existence of the theocrasy between Sabazios and Yahweh (GGR 2: 662; Hengel 1974, 1: 263).

The weakest point of this argument, which in fact compromises the construction as a whole, is the extreme unreliability of its keystone (Kraabel 1978: 28; Levinskaya 1984: 26; 1987: 69; Trebilco 1991: 141). The entire approach is based on the quotation from the Roman compiler Valerius Maximus (1.3.2), which reads in most modern editions (Lane 1979: 35):

Cn. Cornelius Hispalus praetor peregrinus … edicto Chaldaeos citra decimum diem
abire ex urbe atque Italia iussit … Idem Iudaeos, qui Sabazi Iovis cultu Romanos
inficere mores conati erant, repetere domos suas coegit.

Cn. Cornelius Hispalus2 praetor peregrinus.… ordered in his edict that
the Chaldaeans leave the city and Italy within ten days.… He also
compelled Jews, who tried to infect Roman customs with the worship
of Sabazios Jupiter, to return to their homes.

These events took place in 139 BC. The relevant passage falls in a long lacuna, and its text results from an insertion into this lacuna

1 For the bibliography see Bickerman 1958: 146; Hengel 1974, 1: 263, note 43;
and Lane 1979.

2 More accurately Cn. Cornelius Scipio Hispanus, Siegert 1973: 144; Stern
1974–84, 1: 358.

-241-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Supreme Gods of the Bosporan Kingdom: Celestial Aphrodite and the Most High God
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 371

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.