The Ocean of the Soul: Man, the World, and God in the Stories of Farid Al-Din 'Attar

By Hellmut Ritter; John O'Kane | Go to book overview

CHAPTER FIVE
THE UNQUENCHED DRIVE FOR KNOWLEDGE

This is not the place to enter into the different attempts which have been made to explain "the origin of the idea of God". Primordial psychic impulses and primitive stages of consciousness whose investigation has been pursued in various groping attempts, the later human perception that natural events lack a totally rational explanation, the basic need in man to come to terms spiritually, intellectually and practically with his peculiar existential plight in the world, between birth and death, with his subordination to transcendent forces and powers, with the solitude of the human race in the cosmos and that of the individual in his soul, and likewise the need to feel protected by a power superior to all the threatening forces, these are some of the primary factors which could contribute to explaining the phenomenon of the idea of God. Still other elements to consider are man's inner situation, his dependence on an animal and spiritual nature, on drives which he can only imperfectly master, this combined with the desire to overcome that dependence. And then there is the necessity to rein in the Ego which wants to impose itself and expand, to bring under control its excessive sense of self-importance, thereby making social relations possible.

But reflections such as these are based on an idea of a primordial man who is more or less endowed and constructed with the characteristics of a modern human being. The soul of an empirical man, especially of a primitive man, contains many more mysterious characteristics and is far more difficult to comprehend. The phenomenology of religion is considerably richer and more multifarious, and the beginning stages of man's spiritual development lie outside the realm of empirical experience.

Here we are dealing with a late stage of monotheism. To begin with, its essential concern is the firm belief in the real existence of a being raised above all earthly imperfections which, on the one hand, as absolute subject, as the author of all things outside the

-77-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Ocean of the Soul: Man, the World, and God in the Stories of Farid Al-Din 'Attar
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 838

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.