The Ocean of the Soul: Man, the World, and God in the Stories of Farid Al-Din 'Attar

By Hellmut Ritter; John O'Kane | Go to book overview

CHAPTER NINETEEN
WORKS: BEING GOD'S SLAVE

Despite the fact that self-justification through works was denied, the idea that performing works is meritorious was never abandoned in Islam. In this regard one could also have recourse to the Koran: "Whoever has done an ant's weight of good shall see (the reward for) it, and whoever has done an ant's weight of bad shall see (the punishment for) it" (99/7–8).

The idea of reward is fully alive in Ḥārith al-Muhāsibī. The soul will easily bear the laboriousness of performing its duties toward God if it thinks of the sweetness of the reward which awaits it, and Ḥārith does not hesitate to point to the same psychological experience in worldly affairs. The merchant, the architect, etc., undergo difficulty and hardship for the sake of a reward. (Riʿāya 40–41). In popular Islam the attitude supported by the Koran that for every pious act, whether it consists of social works or worship, one may expect a reward (thawāb) in the hereafter, has firmly established itself. Where we say "something for God's sake", i.e. without worldly reward, the Turk says "sevab için" "for reward in the hereafter". One takes an orphan child into one's house under the designation "ahiretlik", i.e. for the sake of reward in the hereafter, or pays the school fees (okutmak) of poor children for reward in the hereafter. One "sends ahead" to the hereafter pious works and is sure that one will find them there as the only good one can possess beyond the grave. (Cf. above pp. 190–91).


1

Paraenesis, and Tradition (ḥadīth) that caters to its needs, happily hold out the prospect of forgiveness of sins and other rewards in the hereafter for completely trivial works, as if this were an interpretation of the Koranic verse cited above. In the pious literature this often takes the form that someone to his amazement sees in a dream vision a deceased sinner who is walking about contentedly

-285-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Ocean of the Soul: Man, the World, and God in the Stories of Farid Al-Din 'Attar
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 838

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.