From Rome to Eternity: Catholicism and the Arts in Italy, ca. 1550-1650

By Pamela M. Jones; Thomas Worcester | Go to book overview

IN FIGURA DIABOLI:
SELF AND MYTH IN CARAVAGGIO'S
DAVID AND GOLIATH

David M. Stone


Franca Trinchieri Camiz in Memoriam

In our celebrity-obsessed, tabloid culture, Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio has become a cult figure, whose personality, sexuality, and criminal record threaten to overshadow his paintings as topics of scholarly inquiry.1 Symptomatic of this fascination with the artist's personal life is the new international craze to hunt for documents revealing tidbits about his character. The trend reached new extremes with the 1994 book Caravaggio Assassino.2 Several critics, already upset by the authors' portrayal of the painter as a Seicento gang-banger, were outraged when they uncovered the fact that some of the so-called Caravaggio documents referenced in the text were not about Caravaggio at all. The artist's name simply does not appear in many of the archival sources cited, thus throwing into question the reliability not only of the relevant passages on Caravaggio's criminal exploits but the book as a whole.3

Discussion of Caravaggio's life now often passes as discourse about Caravaggio's art, as if the man and his paintings were mirror images of each other. In Peter Robb's sensationalist book (complete with a Fritz Lang title), M, Caravaggio and his paintings are sometimes

1 This paper began as a conversation with Paul Barolsky, whom I thank for
advice and encouragement. I am equally indebted to Pamela Jones, not only for
inviting me to participate in the Boston College symposium, but for several fruit-
ful discussions on this topic before and after the conference. Expanded versions of
this lecture were subsequently given at Emory University and the University of
Pennsylvania. I am grateful to Sarah McPhee and Larry Silver, respectively, for
inviting me to speak and for the many insightful comments they, their students and
colleagues offered me. Linda Pellecchia generously read an early draft of the text,
making numerous helpful suggestions.

2 Bassani and Bellini (1994).

3 On the scandal of the documents, see Corradini (1996). On the misleading nature
of the text, which Robb (see below) and others have relied upon, see Langdon (1999b).

-19-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
From Rome to Eternity: Catholicism and the Arts in Italy, ca. 1550-1650
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 277

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.